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National Taiwan University Hospital


#1

The new technique shows it is possible to form completely new hair follicles - a major step forward. Previously scientists have successfully used the technique to grow human hairs on the back of mice. Now the first human study is underway in Taiwan with around 400 men and women. Patients who are undergoing cosmetic surgery at the National Taiwan University Hospital are providing samples of dermal papillae cells from their scalps. These will then be cultured in the lab and implanted into bald patients.

The idea is that this will lead to the growth of new follicles for the first time, rather than transplanting existing hair from one site to another.

The technique could be suitable for people with a limited number of follicles, including those with female-pattern hair loss, scarring alopecia and hair loss due to burns.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2551177/Bald-Now-theres-jab-make-hair-grow-back.html#ixzz2sOM1HFBT
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#2

How is this different from Aderans or Histogen?


#3

400 men and women! That is a very good size, good news!


#4

This looks like part of an ongoing study they already started in 2006, and that will end in 2016.

Maybe they’ve incorporated Drs. Christiano and Jahoda’s recent techniques.


#5

so these guys are taking hair off of one person and implanting into another? wasnt this done 15 years ago? BTW why are we not doing this instead of strip hair transplants. Seems like there are plenty of hairy people out there that would sell some follicles for a decent price. Alec


#6

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
This looks like part of an ongoing study they already started in 2006, and that will end in 2016.

Maybe they’ve incorporated Drs. Christiano and Jahoda’s recent techniques.[/quote]

If this is the same study that was started back in 2006, shouldn’t we have a lot of interim results already? Yeah, I agree this is a large study too with 400 people.


#7

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by alecbaldone[/postedby]
so these guys are taking hair off of one person and implanting into another? wasnt this done 15 years ago? BTW why are we not doing this instead of strip hair transplants. Seems like there are plenty of hairy people out there that would sell some follicles for a decent price. Alec[/quote]

No, I’m 99.9% sure they are NOT taking hair from one person and implanting it into another. Where does it say that? That is NOT really the central focus of the Jahoda/Christiano work.

I think what you may be thinking about is that the Jahoda/Christiano study took cells from a human and implanted them into human skin grafted onto the backs of mice. Technically and obviously, that is taking hair from one person and implanting it into another person’s skin. But I don’t think that was what the study was really trying to demonstrate. They had to do it that way because at this stage they didn’t have permission to implant the cells into the same people that they were harvested from, or into any human being, for that matter. So, even though allografting (same-person harvesting) appears to be central to their study, I think in reality, it was more peripheral and incidental. When and if Jahoda and Christiano get the go-ahead to do this on real human patients, I don’t think allografting will be a requirement. They COULD do it as allografting, but much more likely they’ll focus on autografting – cells harvested from the same patient.

The key in the Jahoda/Christiano study was not so much doing allogenic grafts, but the way the cells are cultured, using a hanging-drop method, which causes them to divide in such a way that it preserves the more primitive gene expression of highly trichogenic, just-harvested (first or zeroth generation) DP cells.

Anyone please correct me if you think I’m wrong in any of the above.

By the way, to clarify, I’m not saying allogenic grafting is bad, or doesn’t have some of its own potential advantages. I’m just saying I don’t think it was the central focus of the Jahoda/Christiano study, and I don’t think they’re doing it in the NTU Hospital study.


#8

the hairloss pipeline is dry, we need hope