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My current regimen


#1

Two years ago, I was losing hair like mad. I then started on Norwegian Salmon oil by Carlsons and Borage Oil or Black Currant Oil by Health from the Sun (1 gram of each). That combination dramatically halted my hair loss. Recently, within the last 4 months, I have been taking Spirulina and only taking the oils once in a while. I am also avoiding all sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and just about anything that takes sweet. I am now starting to see regrowth around my temples again. My hair looks better now than it has in more than 2 1/2 years.

In addtion, I am only shampooing my hair once every other day. I am also still using Vishal’s hair shampoo about once a week. Vishal’s hair shampoo/oils did seem to work for a while but then I stop getting results with them. I have found that if I use them intermittenly, they work better.

Thanks,

Hogan


#2

Hogan,

Posters here should return to the archives, and reread your threads concerning inflammation.

They are essential.


#3

» Hogan,
»
» Posters here should return to the archives, and reread your threads
» concerning inflammation.
»
» They are essential.


#4

Hogan, as you know, I have never been satisfied with just “maintaining,” so I continue, through trial and error, to hone a regimen of natural supplements that will maximize my chances for regrowth.

And though I am still not completely satisfied with the present condition of my hair, I am pleased with the progress that I’ve made thus far.

Present regimen:

  1. pycnogenol (every three days)
  2. green tea extract (Mon, Wed, Fri)
  3. curcumin (Tues, Thurs, Sat, Sun)
  4. borage oil (2 grams daily)
  5. fish oil (1 gram daily)
  6. Chinese herbal combination (several days a month to “flush” the kidneys
    and liver)

#5

» Hogan, as you know, I have never been satisfied with just “maintaining,” so
» I continue, through trial and error, to hone a regimen of natural
» supplements that will maximize my chances for regrowth.
»
» And though I am still not completely satisfied with the present condition
» of my hair, I am pleased with the progress that I’ve made thus far.
»
» Present regimen:
» 1. pycnogenol (every three days)
» 2. green tea extract (Mon, Wed, Fri)
» 3. curcumin (Tues, Thurs, Sat, Sun)
» 4. borage oil (2 grams daily)
» 5. fish oil (1 gram daily)
» 6. Chinese herbal combination (several days a month to “flush” the kidneys
»
» and liver)

You might want to stop the oils while you do especially if you notice increased inflammation.


#6

» Two years ago, I was losing hair like mad. I then started on Norwegian
» Salmon oil by Carlsons and Borage Oil or Black Currant Oil by Health from
» the Sun (1 gram of each). That combination dramatically halted my hair
» loss. Recently, within the last 4 months, I have been taking Spirulina and
» only taking the oils once in a while. I am also avoiding all sugar, high
» fructose corn syrup, and just about anything that takes sweet. I am now
» starting to see regrowth around my temples again. My hair looks better now
» than it has in more than 2 1/2 years.

Hogan, your reason for not eating anything sweet is the rise in blood sugar correct?


#7

» » Two years ago, I was losing hair like mad. I then started on Norwegian
» » Salmon oil by Carlsons and Borage Oil or Black Currant Oil by Health
» from
» » the Sun (1 gram of each). That combination dramatically halted my hair
» » loss. Recently, within the last 4 months, I have been taking Spirulina
» and
» » only taking the oils once in a while. I am also avoiding all sugar,
» high
» » fructose corn syrup, and just about anything that takes sweet. I am now
» » starting to see regrowth around my temples again. My hair looks better
» now
» » than it has in more than 2 1/2 years.
»
» Hogan, your reason for not eating anything sweet is the rise in blood
» sugar correct?

Yes. I am not sure if its the sugar directly or the insulin response that has a detrimental effect on the follicle.


#8

Baldness Linked to Diet?
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.

"The old theory was that the male hormone, testosterone, is converted to another hormone called dihydrotestosterone, that causes hair to grow darker and longer on the bodies, faces and sides of the head of men. Dihydrotestosterone also causes male pattern baldness by making hair on the top of the head thinner, lighter and shorter so you can’t see it. Scientists developed a drug called Proscar to shrink enlarged prostates by blocking the formation of dihydrotestosterone. The same drug is sold as Propecia (at five times the cost) to help hair grow on bald men, but it is not very effective.

More than five years ago I reported that the present treatment for male-pattern baldness is not very effective and that male pattern baldness may be caused by insulin resistance, and that the western diet which is high in sugar and flour may cause irreversible hair loss. A study in the journal Lancet (Sept. 30, 2000) shows that male pattern baldness may well be caused by insulin resistance. Male pattern baldness means loss of hair on the top and front of the head, but not the sides. Insulin resistance means that a person cannot respond well to insulin causing both men and women to have very high blood levels of insulin. When you eat, your blood sugar level rises. To keep blood sugar levels from rising too high, your pancreas releases insulin which drives sugar from the blood into your cells. Some people respond poorly to insulin so their blood sugar levels rise too high and then they produce way too much insulin that causes man and women to lose hair.

Men who are at high risk for male-pattern baldness have the same characteristics as those who are likely to develop diabetes. They store fat primarily in their bellies, rather than their hips, have high blood triglyceride levels, have low blood levels of the good HDL cholesterol that prevents heart attacks, have a family history of diabetes , and are at high risk for suffering a heart attack and eventually developing diabetes.

Another study from Johns Hopkins shows that men who lose their hair early usually have high blood levels of insulin like growth factor-1, a hormone that the body produces in response to high blood sugar levels. Women who have a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome suffer from male-pattern baldness, have high blood insulin levels and can often be cured by taking medication to lower blood sugar levels and restricting foods that raise blood sugar the most, such as those with added sugar, bakery products, pastas and fruit juices. Eat root vegetables and fruits with other foods, and eat plenty of vegetables, whole grains, beans, seeds and nuts."


#9

» Baldness Linked to Diet?
» By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.
»
» “The old theory was that the male hormone, testosterone, is converted to
» another hormone called dihydrotestosterone, that causes hair to grow
» darker and longer on the bodies, faces and sides of the head of men.
» Dihydrotestosterone also causes male pattern baldness by making hair on
» the top of the head thinner, lighter and shorter so you can’t see it.
» Scientists developed a drug called Proscar to shrink enlarged prostates by
» blocking the formation of dihydrotestosterone. The same drug is sold as
» Propecia (at five times the cost) to help hair grow on bald men, but it is
» not very effective.
»
» More than five years ago I reported that the present treatment for
» male-pattern baldness is not very effective and that male pattern baldness
» may be caused by insulin resistance, and that the western diet which is
» high in sugar and flour may cause irreversible hair loss. A study in the
» journal Lancet (Sept. 30, 2000) shows that male pattern baldness may well
» be caused by insulin resistance. Male pattern baldness means loss of hair
» on the top and front of the head, but not the sides. Insulin resistance
» means that a person cannot respond well to insulin causing both men and
» women to have very high blood levels of insulin. When you eat, your blood
» sugar level rises. To keep blood sugar levels from rising too high, your
» pancreas releases insulin which drives sugar from the blood into your
» cells. Some people respond poorly to insulin so their blood sugar levels
» rise too high and then they produce way too much insulin that causes man
» and women to lose hair.
»
» Men who are at high risk for male-pattern baldness have the same
» characteristics as those who are likely to develop diabetes. They store
» fat primarily in their bellies, rather than their hips, have high blood
» triglyceride levels, have low blood levels of the good HDL cholesterol
» that prevents heart attacks, have a family history of diabetes , and are
» at high risk for suffering a heart attack and eventually developing
» diabetes.
»
» Another study from Johns Hopkins shows that men who lose their hair early
» usually have high blood levels of insulin like growth factor-1, a hormone
» that the body produces in response to high blood sugar levels. Women who
» have a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome suffer from male-pattern
» baldness, have high blood insulin levels and can often be cured by taking
» medication to lower blood sugar levels and restricting foods that raise
» blood sugar the most, such as those with added sugar, bakery products,
» pastas and fruit juices. Eat root vegetables and fruits with other foods,
» and eat plenty of vegetables, whole grains, beans, seeds and nuts.”


#10

If I remember correctly, it was Jacob who first posted this article sometime last year. But at the time, no one made much about it. I thought it was significant, so I included it in several of my own posts, and more specifically, I began to search for natural supplements to assist insulin metabolism and combat “insulin spikes” (e.g. chromium polynicotinate, pycnogenol).

Recently, I have noticed that ImmortalHair is addressing the subject of insulin resistance in his posts.


#11

Or actually, I think it may have been “glucose control” that he mentioned.


#12

Hi The Natural,

Its my first in this section …I ve curcumin and Ginger …considering to try it…since it seems its already in your regimen I thought you can give me an idea how do you use it ! Thanks


#13

» Hi The Natural,
»
» Its my first in this section …I ve curcumin and Ginger …considering to
» try it…since it seems its already in your regimen I thought you can give
» me an idea how do you use it ! Thanks

his username is not even valid any more, if you click on it , it is not a link, it is just black


#14

Amilcar, I have used both supplements in the past. To be honest, I am not sure that curcumin did anything positive (or negative). I am, at present, not taking it. I would suggest using Taurine instead. Taurine is cheaper, won’t upset your stomach, and, for me, seemed to work better with the green tea extract (and grape seed extract)that I was taking at the time.

I used ginger (together with garlic) a long time ago, and got mild results over a short period of time.

I see Hangin’ is still here poking his nose in other people’s business…


#15

» Amilcar, I have used both supplements in the past. To be honest, I am not
» sure that curcumin did anything positive (or negative). I am, at present,
» not taking it. I would suggest using Taurine instead. Taurine is cheaper,
» won’t upset your stomach, and, for me, seemed to work better with the green
» tea extract (and grape seed extract)that I was taking at the time.
»
» I used ginger (together with garlic) a long time ago, and got mild results
» over a short period of time.
»
»
»
» I see Hangin’ is still here poking his nose in other people’s business…

at least i have a regimen that works :rotfl: more than i can say for yours


#16

» » Amilcar, I have used both supplements in the past. To be honest, I am
» not
» » sure that curcumin did anything positive (or negative). I am, at
» present,
» » not taking it. I would suggest using Taurine instead. Taurine is
» cheaper,
» » won’t upset your stomach, and, for me, seemed to work better with the
» green
» » tea extract (and grape seed extract)that I was taking at the time.
» »
» » I used ginger (together with garlic) a long time ago, and got mild
» results
» » over a short period of time.
» »
» »
» »
» » I see Hangin’ is still here poking his nose in other people’s
» business…
»
» at least i have a regimen that works :rotfl: more than i can say for yours

also easy to assume you left the board, your last post was in august 2007


#17

» Hi The Natural,
»
» Its my first in this section …I ve curcumin and Ginger …considering to
» try it…since it seems its already in your regimen I thought you can give
» me an idea how do you use it ! Thanks

Lets get a little serious about hairloss and less wishy washy.

curcumin = great for your liver

Ginger = great for your kidneys

If you can include herbs that reduce DHT and Estradiol it should reduce hairloss.

Topically, look for a formula which increases SOD, reduces inflammation and increases bloodflow.

Regards
Pete


#18

Again, for the newcomers to this section, Peter2 is neither a doctor nor chemist. He doesn’t even play one on TV :stuck_out_tongue: .

CHRONIC INFLAMMATION, HAIR LOSS, AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT

 Chronic systemic inflammation has been found to at the root of many serious disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, asthma, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, depression and androgenetic alopecia. These “age related” disorders are accompanied by a pathological increase of inflammatory cytokines. Lowering pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor –alpha, interleukin – 6, interleukin 1(B) and/or interleukin B4, could help prevent and treat many age related diseases. After several published studies, which showed that inflammation is present in androgenetic alopecia, MPB Research reported these important findings to readers, particularly stressing the need to address inflammation in any hair loss treatment approach, including our recommended protocol. Excessive levels of cytokines can be systemically and topically countered by an appropriate regimen of drugs, nutrients, dietary changes, and/or hormones. For example, fish oil has been shown to effectively lower these levels, as does DHEA, Nettle extract, GLA, and some antioxidants (vitamin E and N-acetyl cysteine). Meanwhile certain herbal extracts patented by Asian companies, Emu oil, copper peptides and ketoconazole can be used to topically partially inhibit cytokine formation. Following is an extensive analysis (in layman’s terms) that makes the connection between inflammation, and the “programmed cell death” of the hair follicle, a process known as “apoptosis”. It is partially based upon input from Waseda, a Japanese researcher who has been researching inflammation and androgenetic hair loss for many years. He has been able to initiate extensive hair regrowth after being a “slick bald” Norwood 5 for many years using an aggressive combination of therapies specifically designed to counter inflammation and an apoptosis factors. 

TOWARDS A COMPREHENSIVE TREATMENT OF MPB

 First we must recognize that hair loss is the consequence of hair cell apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Apoptosis is the final result of what is termed the caspase activation cascade. Essentially DHT, superoxide, and other free radicals damage the cell’s mitochondria, and the damaged mitochondria in turn vomits cytochrome C, which activates the caspase 9 cascade. TGF-beta and alpha activate caspase 9 around hair follicles. The activated caspase 9 propagates downstream into caspase 3. Activation of caspase 3 is thought to be a direct cause of cell apoptosis (programmed cell death) in general. What then causes a caspase activation cascade and how can one intervene in the context of hair loss? 
 Protein Kinase C (PKC) as an executor of apoptosis PKC isozymes are involved in the final execution of hair cell apoptosis in relation to caspase 3. What are good inhibitors of PKC?      Cycloporin (dangerous), Grape Seed Extract, Resveratrol (as in red wine), Vitamin E, and N-Acetyl Cysteine. Topically, Grape Seed Extract (a patented treatment for hair loss), and Perilla Leaf Extract. 
 Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-a) as a promotor of PKC and hair cell apoptosis. TNF-a induces the PKC isozymes and causes cell death through this induction. This pathway is known to be a major cause of hair loss. TNF-a is a quick acting proinflammatory cytokine, and TNF-a is over secreted in cases of rapid hair loss. How can TNF-a be safely inhibited?      Ginkgo Biloba Extract, Stinging Nettle Extract, Green Tea Extract, and essential fatty acids found in fish, Emu, Borage, and Perilla oils. Topically, Perilla leaf extract may be useful. 
 TGF-Family as the bridge between DHT and the activation of the caspase cascade. In recent studies researchers have found DHT promotes TGF, and TGF causes activation of the caspase cascade and thus, hair cell death, which clinically manifests as male and female pattern baldness. What inhibits TGH safely, as opposed to the dangerous anti-cancer compounds? Proteolytic Enzymes such as a bromelain, and the anti-oxidant Curcumin are TGF inhibitors. Shiseido, a Japanese cosmetic company found that Amacha, a sugar alternative found in the orient has TGF inhibition properties.      Dr. Sawaya’s latest study about finasteride suggests that the best hair loss prevention would involve the blocking of caspase activation, especially caspase 3. Caspase 3 is the direct cause of programmed hair cell death (apoptosis) that originates “upstream”. The first triggers may be DHT damage or oxidative (free radical) stress on the mitochondria, TGF induction from DHT, TNF-A induction from allergic inflammation, or PKC upregulation by caspase activation. Here we can summarize the rationale behind the treatments of various pro-inflammatory mechanisms. 

DHT inhibition- Finasteride, Saw Palmetto, Rivoflavin, Green Tea Extract, Copper, Peptides, and Topical Bayberry Extract.

PKC down regulation - Grape Seed Extract, Resveratrol, Vitamin E, Soy Isoflavones.

TNF-a down regulation- Curcumin, Ginkgo Biloba Extract, Stinging Nettle Extract, Green Tea Extract, Fish Oil, Borage Oil, Perilla Oil, and Topical Perilla leaf extract.

TGF down regulation- Curcumin, and topical Amacha.

 Taking into account the inhibition of hair apoptosis factors, it is apparent that treatment can be taken to a new level. Again, Waseda himself is experiencing regrowth in all areas of his scalp after being a slick bald “Norwood 5” for many years.

#19

» Again, for the newcomers to this section, Peter2 is neither a doctor nor
» chemist. He doesn’t even play one on TV :stuck_out_tongue: .
»
» CHRONIC INFLAMMATION, HAIR LOSS, AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT
»
»
» Chronic systemic inflammation has been found to at the root of many
» serious disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, asthma, arthritis,
» cancer, diabetes, depression and androgenetic alopecia. These “age
» related” disorders are accompanied by a pathological increase of
» inflammatory cytokines. Lowering pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor
» necrosis factor –alpha, interleukin – 6, interleukin 1(B) and/or
» interleukin B4, could help prevent and treat many age related diseases.
» After several published studies, which showed that inflammation is present
» in androgenetic alopecia, MPB Research reported these important findings to
» readers, particularly stressing the need to address inflammation in any
» hair loss treatment approach, including our recommended protocol.
» Excessive levels of cytokines can be systemically and topically countered
» by an appropriate regimen of drugs, nutrients, dietary changes, and/or
» hormones. For example, fish oil has been shown to effectively lower these
» levels, as does DHEA, Nettle extract, GLA, and some antioxidants (vitamin
» E and N-acetyl cysteine). Meanwhile certain herbal extracts patented by
» Asian companies, Emu oil, copper peptides and ketoconazole can be used to
» topically partially inhibit cytokine formation. Following is an extensive
» analysis (in layman’s terms) that makes the connection between
» inflammation, and the “programmed cell death” of the hair follicle, a
» process known as “apoptosis”. It is partially based upon input from
» Waseda, a Japanese researcher who has been researching inflammation and
» androgenetic hair loss for many years. He has been able to initiate
» extensive hair regrowth after being a “slick bald” Norwood 5 for many
» years using an aggressive combination of therapies specifically designed
» to counter inflammation and an apoptosis factors.
»
»
»
» TOWARDS A COMPREHENSIVE TREATMENT OF MPB
»
» First we must recognize that hair loss is the consequence of hair
» cell apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Apoptosis is the final result of
» what is termed the caspase activation cascade. Essentially DHT, superoxide,
» and other free radicals damage the cell’s mitochondria, and the damaged
» mitochondria in turn vomits cytochrome C, which activates the caspase 9
» cascade. TGF-beta and alpha activate caspase 9 around hair follicles. The
» activated caspase 9 propagates downstream into caspase 3. Activation of
» caspase 3 is thought to be a direct cause of cell apoptosis (programmed
» cell death) in general. What then causes a caspase activation cascade and
» how can one intervene in the context of hair loss?
» Protein Kinase C (PKC) as an executor of apoptosis PKC isozymes are
» involved in the final execution of hair cell apoptosis in relation to
» caspase 3. What are good inhibitors of PKC? Cycloporin (dangerous),
» Grape Seed Extract, Resveratrol (as in red wine), Vitamin E, and N-Acetyl
» Cysteine. Topically, Grape Seed Extract (a patented treatment for hair
» loss), and Perilla Leaf Extract.
» Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-a) as a promotor of PKC and hair
» cell apoptosis. TNF-a induces the PKC isozymes and causes cell death
» through this induction. This pathway is known to be a major cause of hair
» loss. TNF-a is a quick acting proinflammatory cytokine, and TNF-a is over
» secreted in cases of rapid hair loss. How can TNF-a be safely inhibited?
» Ginkgo Biloba Extract, Stinging Nettle Extract, Green Tea Extract, and
» essential fatty acids found in fish, Emu, Borage, and Perilla oils.
» Topically, Perilla leaf extract may be useful.
» TGF-Family as the bridge between DHT and the activation of the
» caspase cascade. In recent studies researchers have found DHT promotes
» TGF, and TGF causes activation of the caspase cascade and thus, hair cell
» death, which clinically manifests as male and female pattern baldness.
» What inhibits TGH safely, as opposed to the dangerous anti-cancer
» compounds? Proteolytic Enzymes such as a bromelain, and the anti-oxidant
» Curcumin are TGF inhibitors. Shiseido, a Japanese cosmetic company found
» that Amacha, a sugar alternative found in the orient has TGF inhibition
» properties. Dr. Sawaya’s latest study about finasteride suggests that
» the best hair loss prevention would involve the blocking of caspase
» activation, especially caspase 3. Caspase 3 is the direct cause of
» programmed hair cell death (apoptosis) that originates “upstream”. The
» first triggers may be DHT damage or oxidative (free radical) stress on the
» mitochondria, TGF induction from DHT, TNF-A induction from allergic
» inflammation, or PKC upregulation by caspase activation. Here we can
» summarize the rationale behind the treatments of various pro-inflammatory
» mechanisms.
»
» DHT inhibition- Finasteride, Saw Palmetto, Rivoflavin, Green Tea Extract,
» Copper, Peptides, and Topical Bayberry Extract.
»
» PKC down regulation - Grape Seed Extract, Resveratrol, Vitamin E, Soy
» Isoflavones.
»
» TNF-a down regulation- Curcumin, Ginkgo Biloba Extract, Stinging
» Nettle Extract, Green Tea Extract, Fish Oil, Borage Oil, Perilla Oil, and
» Topical Perilla leaf extract.
»
» TGF down regulation- Curcumin, and topical Amacha.
»
» Taking into account the inhibition of hair apoptosis factors, it is
» apparent that treatment can be taken to a new level. Again, Waseda himself
» is experiencing regrowth in all areas of his scalp after being a slick bald
» “Norwood 5” for many years.

Still copying and pasting I see - I wonder how you are fairing with your progesterone cream :slight_smile:

Regards
Pete


#20

Oh, I do copy and paste. I don’t plagiarize like you do, pumpkin eater, pretending to be something other than one of the many resident librarians here.

I also share my experiences with others as well :wink: . I used Roger Mason’s Hair Again for about four months, which as you will recall, contained progesterone cream, but can’t say if it did anything special. I am still researching the effect that excess estrogen can have on males as we age.