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Mouse to mouse worked, will human to human?


#1

Mouse to mouse worked, human to mouse did not. How well do you think human to human will do?

Click here for link

"When I arrive at Aderans, Dr. Washenik hastily ushers me past several labs, perhaps wary I might glimpse some sort of trade secret, and into an empty conference room. What he does reveal is that his approach to hair cloning (he calls it follicular neogenesis) doesn’t rely solely on dermal papillae. “We are using a two-cell construct, growing not just dermal papillae but also another type of cell from the follicle,” he explains. As the thinking goes, disparate cell types already communicate with one another in the follicle to regenerate hair. Dr. Washenik believes that if he can recreate that environment in the lab, cultured cells won’t get dementia and forget how to make hair. “The different cells in the follicle are smarter than we are,” says Dr. Washenik. “They already know they are supposed to be hairy. In eight days, we grew a ball of hair that never existed before on the back of a mouse.”

Dr. Washenik clicks an image file on his computer: The photo shows what looks like Piglet—but with a sable Mohawk. But there is a caveat: “These were hair cells from a mouse that were injected into a mouse. When researchers injected human cells into a mouse, they didn’t get the same results.” This disappointed Dr. Washenik and other researchers, because unlike other organs, follicles are supposed to be immune privileged: When transplanted across or between species, they’re expected to grow normally, without being rejected or provoking infection. He hopes to have better luck in clinical trials, when he will transplant human cells into humans. Aderans is in the second phase of a human trial, which is expected to be completed by the end of the year."

(sorry if this is a repost)


#2

» Mouse to mouse worked, human to mouse did not. How well do you think human
» to human will do?
»
» Click
» here for link

»
» “When I arrive at Aderans, Dr. Washenik hastily ushers me past several
» labs, perhaps wary I might glimpse some sort of trade secret, and into an
» empty conference room. What he does reveal is that his approach to hair
» cloning (he calls it follicular neogenesis) doesn’t rely solely on dermal
» papillae. “We are using a two-cell construct, growing not just dermal
» papillae but also another type of cell from the follicle,” he explains. As
» the thinking goes, disparate cell types already communicate with one
» another in the follicle to regenerate hair. Dr. Washenik believes that if
» he can recreate that environment in the lab, cultured cells won’t get
» dementia and forget how to make hair. “The different cells in the follicle
» are smarter than we are,” says Dr. Washenik. “They already know they are
» supposed to be hairy. In eight days, we grew a ball of hair that never
» existed before on the back of a mouse.”
»
» Dr. Washenik clicks an image file on his computer: The photo shows what
» looks like Piglet—but with a sable Mohawk. But there is a caveat: “These
» were hair cells from a mouse that were injected into a mouse. When
» researchers injected human cells into a mouse, they didn’t get the same
» results.” This disappointed Dr. Washenik and other researchers, because
» unlike other organs, follicles are supposed to be immune privileged: When
» transplanted across or between species, they’re expected to grow normally,
» without being rejected or provoking infection. He hopes to have better luck
» in clinical trials, when he will transplant human cells into humans.
» Aderans is in the second phase of a human trial, which is expected to be
» completed by the end of the year.”
»
» (sorry if this is a repost)

What’s the date on that article? I didn’t see one. This, however, is my favorite quote:

“I’d rather save my dough and wait for a viable hair-cloning procedure, which many of the experts I talked to claim is less than FIVE YEARS AWAY.”

LOL - they really are a bunch of liars, aren’t they.


#3

» What’s the date on that article? I didn’t see one. This, however, is my

i think date might be march 2009? (relying on the first comment below the article)


#4

resuscitation? :slight_smile:


#5

yes, human to human, cell transplantation, works. Its called allogenic (instead of autologous).


#6

» What’s the date on that article? I didn’t see one. This, however, is my
» favorite quote:
»
» “I’d rather save my dough and wait for a viable hair-cloning procedure,
» which many of the experts I talked to claim is less than FIVE YEARS AWAY.”
»
» LOL - they really are a bunch of liars, aren’t they.

Hahaha, good quote of Dr. Washenik.
But I think these PhaseII trials are no lie.


#7

The company is pouring serious cash (Dr. Washenik won’t say how much) into its hair-cloning effort. Dr. Washenik is also intrigued by other researchers who are pursuing another pathway. They’re cultivating in vitro microscopic hairs, or “proto-hairs,” as Dr. Washenik dubs them. “These are early follicular structures that you can place in the scalp with the same technology that’s used for a hair transplant,” he says. "The big hurdle so far is getting the cells to multiply to make enough hair. Once we culture them, they sometimes die or de-differentiate.
)


#8

If we’re still bald in 20 years, at least this time it won’t be for lack of a concerted effort by researchers.

If mankind is capable of nailing HM any time soon then I think they probably will.


#9

This will definitely be interesting to see if they can duplicate the results of mouse to mouse to human to human. I certainly hope for all of our sakes that this can become a reality.


#10

so, cell transfer from mouse to mouse works, but not human to mouse… so, they think that maybe human to human works? didn’t that UK company prove that didnt work?


#11

» so, cell transfer from mouse to mouse works, but not human to mouse… so,
» they think that maybe human to human works? didn’t that UK company prove
» that didnt work?

What Intercytex? No, they say it worked! HM works to 100% certainty. The only question is how well, i.e. how much, what quality and consistency is produced.


#12

(bumping roger_that’s threads off the bottom of the page)