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Long term propecia use


#1

I have been on Propecia for 10 years now and 5% minox for the last 5 years. Are there any other long term users out there that have seen diminished results over time? Does anyone still have shedding after many years of use? My current regimen seems to not be effective anymore (either that or I’m just paranoid). Does anyone know if Saw Palmetto can be used in conjunction with Propecia?
Thanks!


#2

» I have been on Propecia for 10 years now and 5% minox for the last 5 years.
» Are there any other long term users out there that have seen diminished
» results over time? Does anyone still have shedding after many years of
» use? My current regimen seems to not be effective anymore (either that or
» I’m just paranoid). Does anyone know if Saw Palmetto can be used in
» conjunction with Propecia?
» Thanks!

since it is a drug, your body probably developed a resistance to it

which your body should not do with natural DHT inhibitors like Saw Palmetto, etc
Saw Palmetto is not a strong DHT blocker, it is one of the weakest out there, should ideally be combined with other dht blockers, see my sig


#3

“your body probably developed a resistance to it which your body should not do with natural DHT inhibitors like Saw Palmetto”

What is your basis for stating this? It’s inaccurate.

The body can develop a resistance to naturals as well. That is why it is good to rotate or periodically take a break from using supplements, as they lose their effectiveness with continued use over time.


#4

» “your body probably developed a resistance to it which your body should not
» do with natural DHT inhibitors like Saw Palmetto”
»
» What is your basis for stating this? It’s inaccurate.
»
» The body can develop a resistance to naturals as well. That is why it is
» good to rotate or periodically take a break from using supplements, as
» they lose their effectiveness with continued use over time.

I do not believe supplements lose their effectiveness over time, that is like saying your body develops a resistance to vitamins in food

preposterous


#5

Your body can develop some kind of tolerance/accomodation to a lot of things that you take in excess, vitamins, “natural,” or not.

Just look at insulin resistance.

If primitive cavemen had nutritionists back then, the nutritionists probably would have laughed at the idea that anyone could develop a “tolerance” to sugars. Their lifestyle & food options just didn’t even begin to offer enough sugar to cause the condition. And they were so hard-up for sugars in general that they probably would have had a hard time thinking of anything related to sugars as very “bad” for your body at all.

But in modern times, when we’ve sugar-spiked everything we eat to a ludicrous degree, for decades on end, eventually a form of sugar “tolerance” develops in people.

If you overload your body on anything for a long period of time, then your body is probably gonna start trying to change to handle it differently.

I believe your body will never technically develop a tolerance to Finasteride in the traditional sense. But your androgen receptors can certainly increase their sensitivity over time in compensation to long-term androgen deprivation.

I’ve also read there are cases of androgen-dependent prostate tumors gradually adapting to accept androgen-like stimulation from other hormones than just Test & DHT. It has frustrated a lot of attempts to control prostate tumors with long-term regimens of DHT inhibiting drugs.

I’ve personally just about given up on trying to understand all the effects that people run into with Finasteride. Seems like there are some things are are too commonly/consistently reported not to have some truth in them, but they don’t fit into any exising explanation.


#6

» I believe your body will never technically develop a tolerance to
» Finasteride in the traditional sense. But your androgen receptors can
» certainly increase their sensitivity over time in compensation to
» long-term androgen deprivation.

I doubt that it happens slowly over a period of years. I think it happens QUICKLY. It’s just the cell’s natural feedback mechanism to try to maintain the same androgenic stimulus. It almost certainly happens with any other type of antiandrogenic treatment, too, like castration (for example). I don’t think there’s any real significance to the phenomenon.

» I’ve also read there are cases of androgen-dependent prostate tumors
» gradually adapting to accept androgen-like stimulation from other hormones
» than just Test & DHT. It has frustrated a lot of attempts to control
» prostate tumors with long-term regimens of DHT inhibiting drugs.

Prostate cancer cells eventually evolve into a form that no longer depends on androgens for growth.

.


#7

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#8

It all makes me really hope that the new ASC-J9 stuff (or something else working along the same lines) comes to fruition.

Seems like a combination of topical androgen deprivation AND topical receptor degradation would work such a one-two punch against the DHT problem. Reduce the androgen stimulation in your scalp, while simultaneously fighting your scalp’s only way of compensating for the reduced androgen stimulation.

Seems like that pairing might potentially be MUCH more effective than just the traditional anti-androgen drugs alone.