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Kit to isolate and culture Treg cells


#1

Where is everybody?? I thought there would be more interest in this. Nobody here care about Treg cells except myself and Dr Kemp??

People, I really think this is the answer. People are so used research not panning out, but I suspect the Treg issue is the underlying problem that has caused ALL efforts to find a cell-based cure (Intercytex, Aderans, Gho, Replicel so far, etc.) to fail.

Treg cells CAN BE CULTURED, as Dr Kemp says, and there’s even at least one company offering a kit which enables labs to isolate and culture Treg cells…


#2

I doubt that Treg cells on its own can rejuvenate or regenerate hair follicle. Perhaps, as you said , they are necessarry as other important cells but not sufficient. Considering all previous attempts in the last two decades to regenerate follicle, it would be nearly unthinkable that scientists missed that one. Also, let’s remember what Dr.P.Kemp said, that researchers and developers are trying to find formula that needs the least amount of cells for the solution. Any additional cell in the process means more labour intensity, more costly. Hence, less commercially attractive.
Although, I suspect there could be one remote possibility of Tregs effect on hair follicle. We know from Cotsarelis works that “dead” follicle still contains pool of stem cells intact. Maybe Tregs somehow influence those stem cells to produce or not produce?


#4

Agree with most of what you say there.

[quote=“Otter, post:2, topic:27674”]
I doubt that Treg cells on its own can rejuvenate or regenerate hair follicle. Perhaps, as you said , they are necessarry as other important cells but not sufficient.[/quote]

Totally agree with that, and of course with what I said. I think the workings of the follicle are so complex that likely no one cell, or biochemical mechanism by itself, will be the basis of a cure. But, if Treg cells are the cells that activate stem cells, and stem cells are the cells that generate DP cells, then there is a strong connection between all three. Conceivably, the Treg cells could be disproportionately important because they seem to be at the beginning of that sequence.

[quote=“Otter, post:2, topic:27674”]
Considering all previous attempts in the last two decades to regenerate follicle, it would be nearly unthinkable that scientists missed that one.[/quote]

Yes, I’ve seen some articles and posts with speculation about Treg cells and hair from before this recent discovery in San Francisco (specifically I found some from 2015), but it’s completely conceivable they didn’t really establish a firm connection until now, because sadly, there is still a lot researchers don’t know. And hair loss research is seriously underfunded. Most of these recent discoveries have been happening by accident – which means there was no one purposely trying to find them, because there isn’t a great deal of basic research being done on hair loss and the follicle, compared to “debilitating” diseases.
There’s a lot we don’t know… For instance, what’s the connection between Tregs and JAK inhibitors? There probably is one, but they won’t know what it is until it’s researched.

[quote=“Otter, post:2, topic:27674”]
Also, let’s remember what Dr.P.Kemp said, that researchers and developers are trying to find formula that needs the least amount of cells for the solution. Any additional cell in the process means more labour intensity, more costly. Hence, less commercially attractive.[/quote]

Totally agree with that. The more cell types required, the more complex any procedure would get, and the less attractive it is for commercial developers. But, let’s say that they find out that adding Treg cells improves yield tremendously. Do you think at least one company won’t be interested? They’ll just bite the bullet and develop the treatment, even if it requires multiple cell types. So – big disincentive to get into it from the start, but once someone shows it works well, then there’s suddenly a tremendous incentive for companies to jump in.

[quote=“Otter, post:2, topic:27674”]
Maybe Tregs somehow influence those stem cells to produce or not produce?[/quote]

That’s exactly what they’re saying, and if true, then Treg cells are definitely important for a cell-based cure. The positive thing is, they’re apparently very easy to isolate from the body (you don’t have to collect them from the scalp, because they exist throughout the body), and they’re easy to multiply in culture. To me, this is an ideal project for Dr Kemp and HairClone.


#5

I guess most people are like me, no clue what Treg cells are.


#6

I haven’t checked this one out yet.

I can’t speak for everyone but personally I find myself getting into the pattern of getting super excited about some new research but disappointed after waiting for years and see nothing came out of any of the studies. Even for products like Histogen, Replicel etc, these have been discussed for years now and still not available on the market.


#7

I haven’t watched the entire video. Does Treg cells isolation and culture require FDA approval? Is the kit available for sale in the US?


#8

I think clinical use of Treg cells on patients would be considered a “biological” and would require FDA approval. Just experimenting with injecting Treg cells into the same patient where they’re harvested from, though, probably wouldn’t require FDA approval unless the cells are manipulated or changed in the lab.