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ISHRS 2013 conference


#1

Anyone going to this conference? I wonder what Dr. Jahoda has up his sleeve.

http://www.ishrs.org/sites/default/files/users/user3/program_ishrs-2013asm-sf_web_06-29-13.pdf


#2

Last news on Jahoda that I heard was he was working with Dr. Angela Christiano on follicular neo-generation using aggregation of cells and some genetic markers.

Christiano & Jahoda filed a patent on it around 2010. I think they both (or just Christiano) has a company setup which is researching the above - but I don’t know its name.

It does not have a website last I checked so its a private enterprise.


#3

Whatever Jahoda has up his sleeve he is taking forever to get it into the marketplace.

Isn’t ISHRS the biggest and most important of these hair research meetings?

Is anyone expecting any breakthroughs?

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by Freddie555[/postedby]
Last news on Jahoda that I heard was he was working with Dr. Angela Christiano on follicular neo-generation using aggregation of cells and some genetic markers.

Christiano & Jahoda filed a patent on it around 2010. I think they both (or just Christiano) has a company setup which is researching the above - but I don’t know its name.

It does not have a website last I checked so its a private enterprise.[/quote]


#4

I hope Jahoda has new breakthrough information. But if all he has is what was recently reported then that means that he still has to figure out how to get the other 78% of genes to express during multi-month culture so he can cultivate large amounts of autograft tissue. This could take years.

Or else we will have to consider trying to use multi-donor allografts sooner…as in presently.


#5

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
I hope Jahoda has new breakthrough information. But if all he has is what was recently reported then that means that he still has to figure out how to get the other 78% of genes to express during multi-month culture so he can cultivate large amounts of autograft tissue. This could take years.

Or else we will have to consider trying to use multi-donor allografts sooner…as in presently.[/quote]

By the way, I think you’re confusing a few things.

I haven’t seen anything that indicates the amount of gene expression is expected to be any different whether it’s an allogenic culture or autogenic. Nor is it linked to whether the cells are taken from someone with MPB versus someone with no MPB (the cells have the potential to be inductive as long as you take the cells from an area of scalp without MPB).

Whether you’re doing an allograft or an autograft, DP cells cultured outside the body, in vitro, would be expected to have the same LOW rate of relevant gene expression. It’s not about allograft vs. autograft, it’s about the cells replicating in the body versus in vitro.

The 22% rate of relevant gene expression was found in a mixed culture of cells which were allogenic to the foreskin tissue. But they didn’t have this low rate of expression because they were allogenic, they had it because they were cultured outside the body. The 3D hanging drop technique was what raised the gene expression to 22% from a lower percentage.

If you took DP cells from a man with a very thick head of hair, cultured them in vitro, and then injected them, they’d still have a very low rate of gene expression, and wouldn’t be very inductive – unless you did something in the culture to trick the cells into thinking they’re in the body. That is the MAIN deciding factor whether the cells end up being inductive or not.

It has nothing to do with allogenic vs. autogenic, MPB donor vs. non-MPB donor, etc.


#6

Jahoda is still doing basic research on growing new follicles. They have a long way to go. In my opinion, that technology is easily 10-20 years away from commercialization. In other words, for guys over 30, of which i’m unfortunately a part, it’s not even relevant.

I wouldn’t expect anything major to come out of the conference. We already know what Jahoda and Christiano have been doing from their youtube video - which is what they’ll most likely present at the conference.

Probably the most relevant thing to us will be the discussion of Dr. Wesley’s pilofocus. Scarless with better graft viability, though not what any of us are dreaming of in terms of treatments, is a good thing. If it works as advertised, it would be a step (a small one) forward. Which is all we can ask for after this year of continual disappointment.


#7

By using allograft donor tissue instead of autograft donor tissue the whole issue of losing inductivity over months of culturing becomes irrelevant because instead of a milti-month process of culturing the cells into many more cells you could simply acquire the larger number of cells needed by getting the cells from more donors.

For example, let’s say you need 1,000 cells and in your own donor area you have 100 cells. You would have to culture your 100 cells for 2 months to turn them into 1,000 cells but that would take 2 months and your cells would lose inductivity so they would not function as desired. You have to spend years figuring out a way to get the cells to hang onto their inductivity for 2 months so you could complete the culture process without eliminating the cells inductivity.

Or you could instead get the 1000 donor cells from 10 different donors all at the same time, taking 100 cells from each one of them, and then immediately implanting all 1000 donor cells (from your 10 different donors) into the recipient’s head.

This eliminates the need to try to figure out how to get the cells to retain their inductivity for 2 months, which could take years to figure out.

Now of course these numbers I am using of total cells needed being 1,000 and harvesting 100 cells from a donor area are all incorrect numbers. These numbers aren’t even close. I have only used these numbers for the purpose of making my point clear.

Also, one article I read, which I already posted, said that Jahoda cultured his own hair cells for a couple days before implanting them into his wife’s arm. This means that you could culture allograft tissue for perhaps a couple days to get some replication without losing inductivity and then implant the the material into a thinning person’s head.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
I hope Jahoda has new breakthrough information. But if all he has is what was recently reported then that means that he still has to figure out how to get the other 78% of genes to express during multi-month culture so he can cultivate large amounts of autograft tissue. This could take years.

Or else we will have to consider trying to use multi-donor allografts sooner…as in presently.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]

By the way, I think you’re confusing a few things.

I haven’t seen anything that indicates the amount of gene expression is expected to be any different whether it’s an allogenic culture or autogenic. Nor is it linked to whether the cells are taken from someone with MPB versus someone with no MPB (the cells have the potential to be inductive as long as you take the cells from an area of scalp without MPB).

Whether you’re doing an allograft or an autograft, DP cells cultured outside the body, in vitro, would be expected to have the same LOW rate of relevant gene expression. It’s not about allograft vs. autograft, it’s about the cells replicating in the body versus in vitro.

The 22% rate of relevant gene expression was found in a mixed culture of cells which were allogenic to the foreskin tissue. But they didn’t have this low rate of expression because they were allogenic, they had it because they were cultured outside the body. The 3D hanging drop technique was what raised the gene expression to 22% from a lower percentage.

If you took DP cells from a man with a very thick head of hair, cultured them in vitro, and then injected them, they’d still have a very low rate of gene expression, and wouldn’t be very inductive – unless you did something in the culture to trick the cells into thinking they’re in the body. That is the MAIN deciding factor whether the cells end up being inductive or not.

It has nothing to do with allogenic vs. autogenic, MPB donor vs. non-MPB donor, etc.[/quote]


#8

Yea, Jahoda may be a long way off if we have to use autograft cells because we can’t possibly harvest enough cells from one person - yourself - to dramatically impact the thickness of your hair so we have no choice but to culture the cells we get from your donor area to produce enough cells, and unfortunately the culturing process take months and over a period of months your cells lose their inductivity and thereby become ineffective.

But what if instead of cultivating cells from your head we used multiple donors to acquire the cells so that we wouldn’t have to culture the cells for months?

The advantage to using allograft tissue is that it allows us to skip the multi-month culturing process because instead of using the multi-month culturing process to increase the number of cells we simply utilize more donor persons as the means to get enough donor cells.

Autograft = one donor (yourself) and multi-month culture process to turn the cells from the one person (yourself) into a sufficient number of cells.

Allograft = more donor persons (maybe 10 people) so that you harvest tissue from more donor persons resulting in more donor tissue because your using more donors rather than because you culture the tissue after getting the tissue from one person.

Autograft = one donor

Allograft = possibility of multiple donors.


#9

Using allografts opens up the possibility of using multiple donors to treat one bald person whereas using autografts only allows you to use just one donor person - yourself.

If you use multiple donors - say 10 donor persons - you can get more cells because there are more donor persons and then perhaps you can eliminate the time-consuming need to culture the cells and that will solve the problem of inductivity loss because you could inject the cells much sooner because you would culture them for a few days rather than a few months.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by Mr. Z[/postedby]
Jahoda is still doing basic research on growing new follicles. They have a long way to go. In my opinion, that technology is easily 10-20 years away from commercialization. In other words, for guys over 30, of which i’m unfortunately a part, it’s not even relevant.

I wouldn’t expect anything major to come out of the conference. We already know what Jahoda and Christiano have been doing from their youtube video - which is what they’ll most likely present at the conference.

Probably the most relevant thing to us will be the discussion of Dr. Wesley’s pilofocus. Scarless with better graft viability, though not what any of us are dreaming of in terms of treatments, is a good thing. If it works as advertised, it would be a step (a small one) forward. Which is all we can ask for after this year of continual disappointment.[/quote]


#10

Yes like you said, “A man.” One man. Yes, if they took the dp cells from one man they would still have the a very low rate of gene expression/inductivity if you spend a couple months culturing them, but what if you reduced the amount of time you culture from 2 months down to 2 days?

And you could possibly do this if you were able to start out with more donor tissue. But you can only get so many donor cells from one man. But what if you involved 10 men as donors instead of just one donor man? And unlike autografting, doesn’t allografting allow using more than one man to get donor tissue from?


#11

why dont you petition the FDA to fast track allogenic transplants for the life-threatening disease: MPB.

Now go away you troll.

[quote]Using allografts opens up the possibility of using multiple donors to treat one bald person whereas using autografts only allows you to use just one donor person - yourself.

If you use multiple donors - say 10 donor persons - you can get more cells because there are more donor persons and then perhaps you can eliminate the time-consuming need to culture the cells and that will solve the problem of inductivity loss because you could inject the cells much sooner because you would culture them for a few days rather than a few months.

[postedby]Originally Posted by Mr. Z[/postedby]
Jahoda is still doing basic research on growing new follicles. They have a long way to go. In my opinion, that technology is easily 10-20 years away from commercialization. In other words, for guys over 30, of which i’m unfortunately a part, it’s not even relevant.

I wouldn’t expect anything major to come out of the conference. We already know what Jahoda and Christiano have been doing from their youtube video - which is what they’ll most likely present at the conference.

Probably the most relevant thing to us will be the discussion of Dr. Wesley’s pilofocus. Scarless with better graft viability, though not what any of us are dreaming of in terms of treatments, is a good thing. If it works as advertised, it would be a step (a small one) forward. Which is all we can ask for after this year of continual disappointment.

[postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby][/quote]