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Interesting article about HM from Men\'s Health Magazine


#1

The New Science of Hair Growth


#2

it is the same story I heard 10 years agoooooooooo:yes:


#3

» The New
» Science of Hair Growth

Clearly the comments on the bottom of the page are not from people on this form.


#4

This is a relatively recent article, since it mentions the meeting with Aderans and how Aderans is in phase 2 of their clinical trials. They just entered phase 2 recently.


#5

Here are some quotes from this article:

"In Philadelphia, Ken Washenik, M.D., Ph.D., executive vice president of scientific and medical development for Aderans Research Institute and a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at New York University’s Langone Medical Center, shows me slides of nude mice on his laptop. They have undergone a new type of hair-cloning procedure that Dr. Washenik has been developing for Aderans. The company, which has its headquarters in Tokyo, is the world’s largest manufacturer of wigs. It also owns Bosley, which operates 88 hair-transplant clinics in North America.

When I arrive at Aderans, Dr. Washenik hastily ushers me past several labs, perhaps wary I might glimpse some sort of trade secret, and into an empty conference room. What he does reveal is that his approach to hair cloning (he calls it follicular neogenesis) doesn’t rely solely on dermal papillae. “We are using a two-cell construct, growing not just dermal papillae, but also another type of cell from the follicle,” he explains.

The company is pouring serious cash (Dr. Washenik won’t say how much) into its hair-cloning effort. Dr. Washenik is also intrigued by other researchers who are pursuing another pathway. They’re cultivating in vitro microscopic hairs, or “proto-hairs,” as Dr. Washenik dubs them. “These are early follicular structures that you can place in the scalp with the same technology that’s used for a hair transplant,” he says. “The big hurdle so far is getting the cells to multiply to make enough hair. Once we culture them, they sometimes die or de-differentiate.”

But Dr. Washenik remains confident. “The sooner we figure this out, the better,” he says. "So many people are waiting for this technology. I know that with every medical advance, the first one to market becomes the leader, and everyone else plays catch-up. Aderans is in the second phase of a human trial, which is expected to be completed by the end of the year. "

"A key to the team’s success has been growing proto-hairs in a special medium, licensed from a Japanese inventor, which contains cultured skin cells known as keratinocytes. “I’m very excited about this technology,” Dr. Cooley says. “It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when.”

Bessam Farjo, M.D., a hair-restoration surgeon contracted by Intercytex to run its ongoing clinical trials, says, “All I can tell you is that we’ve grown a significant number of hairs on animals through this technique.” It sounds encouraging, and Dr. Farjo expects to complete clinical trials this year.

Hair cloning will be pricey initially, so early adopters may be men who are not only wealthy, but also desperate because they don’t have enough hair left to do a follicular unit transplant. Cloning could also be ideal for younger men who aren’t good candidates for follicular grafting. “Younger guys aren’t suitable for current surgical techniques because we don’t know how much hair they are going to lose,” Dr. Farjo says. "

"Another question is how will the cloned cells be transplanted? Instead of transplanting follicular units, your surgeon may inject cloned cells into micro-incisions, or he may implant lab-grown hair follicles. It could be fast, clean, and painless. Or it might entail something closer to Dr. Cotsarelis’s method at Follica. At Intercytex, technicians are tinkering with sundry techniques. “We’re experimenting with varying the number of cells in each injection, and whether we have to inject the cells into the skin as it is, or if we have to pre-stimulate the skin,” Dr. Farjo says.

Whatever the outcome, choices will abound. In the future, hair cloning will coexist alongside follicular unit transplants, drug therapies, and emerging technologies still incubating in the labs. For his part, Dr. Harris is also part of a team designing the world’s first follicular extraction robot: It will fully automate the procedure, making it magnitudes faster and less expensive."


#6

» he says. “The big hurdle so
» far is getting the cells to multiply to make enough hair. Once we culture
» them, they sometimes die or de-differentiate.

This problem shouldn’t be anymore, recent study by Elaine Fuch’s lab grad says that BMP6 keeps the dermal papilla cells from dying or losing their identity. Hopefully, this discovery will also help Intercytex in enhancing their current procedure.


#7

» This problem shouldn’t be anymore, recent study by Elaine Fuch’s lab grad
» says that BMP6 keeps the dermal papilla cells from dying or losing their
» identity. Hopefully, this discovery will also help Intercytex in enhancing
» their current procedure.

Yea, and that would be quite helpful as that was the main obstacle.


#8

it s pretty much that we already knew except this paragraph which says aderans will complete phase 2 trial the end of this year!

"Aderans is in the second phase of a human trial, which is expected to be completed by the end of the year. "


#9

» it s pretty much that we already knew except this paragraph which says
» aderans will complete phase 2 trial the end of this year!
»
I knew that already as well. It’s old info.


#10

» Here are some quotes from this article:
»
» "In Philadelphia, Ken Washenik, M.D., Ph.D., executive vice president of
» scientific and medical development for Aderans Research Institute and a
» clinical assistant professor of dermatology at New York University’s
» Langone Medical Center, shows me slides of nude mice on his laptop. They
» have undergone a new type of hair-cloning procedure that Dr. Washenik has
» been developing for Aderans. The company, which has its headquarters in
» Tokyo, is the world’s largest manufacturer of wigs. It also owns Bosley,
» which operates 88 hair-transplant clinics in North America.
»
» When I arrive at Aderans, Dr. Washenik hastily ushers me past several
» labs, perhaps wary I might glimpse some sort of trade secret, and into an
» empty conference room. What he does reveal is that his approach to hair
» cloning (he calls it follicular neogenesis) doesn’t rely solely on dermal
» papillae. “We are using a two-cell construct, growing not just dermal
» papillae, but also another type of cell from the follicle,” he explains.
»
» The company is pouring serious cash (Dr. Washenik won’t say how much) into
» its hair-cloning effort. Dr. Washenik is also intrigued by other
» researchers who are pursuing another pathway. They’re cultivating in vitro
» microscopic hairs, or “proto-hairs,” as Dr. Washenik dubs them. “These are
» early follicular structures that you can place in the scalp with the same
» technology that’s used for a hair transplant,” he says. “The big hurdle so
» far is getting the cells to multiply to make enough hair. Once we culture
» them, they sometimes die or de-differentiate.”
»
» But Dr. Washenik remains confident. “The sooner we figure this out, the
» better,” he says. "So many people are waiting for this technology. I know
» that with every medical advance, the first one to market becomes the
» leader, and everyone else plays catch-up. Aderans is in the second phase of
» a human trial, which is expected to be completed by the end of the year. "
»
»
»
»
» "A key to the team’s success has been growing proto-hairs in a special
» medium, licensed from a Japanese inventor, which contains cultured skin
» cells known as keratinocytes. “I’m very excited about this technology,” Dr.
» Cooley says. “It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when.”
»
» Bessam Farjo, M.D., a hair-restoration surgeon contracted by Intercytex to
» run its ongoing clinical trials, says, “All I can tell you is that we’ve
» grown a significant number of hairs on animals through this technique.” It
» sounds encouraging, and Dr. Farjo expects to complete clinical trials this
» year.
»
» Hair cloning will be pricey initially, so early adopters may be men who
» are not only wealthy, but also desperate because they don’t have enough
» hair left to do a follicular unit transplant. Cloning could also be ideal
» for younger men who aren’t good candidates for follicular grafting.
» “Younger guys aren’t suitable for current surgical techniques because we
» don’t know how much hair they are going to lose,” Dr. Farjo says. "
»
»
»
» “Another question is how will the cloned cells be transplanted? Instead of
» transplanting follicular units, your surgeon may inject cloned cells into
» micro-incisions, or he may implant lab-grown hair follicles. It could be
» fast, clean, and painless. Or it might entail something closer to Dr.
» Cotsarelis’s method at Follica. At Intercytex, technicians are tinkering
» with sundry techniques. “We’re experimenting with varying the number of
» cells in each injection, and whether we have to inject the cells into the
» skin as it is, or if we have to pre-stimulate the skin,” Dr. Farjo says.
»
» Whatever the outcome, choices will abound. In the future, hair cloning
» will coexist alongside follicular unit transplants, drug therapies, and
» emerging technologies still incubating in the labs. For his part, Dr.
» Harris is also part of a team designing the world’s first follicular
» extraction robot: It will fully automate the procedure, making it
» magnitudes faster and less expensive.”

This article is at least 6 months old.


#11

» » it s pretty much that we already knew except this paragraph which says
» » aderans will complete phase 2 trial the end of this year!
» »
» I knew that already as well. It’s old info.

Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but for these to be FDA trials, wouldn’t they need to be listed on clinicaltrials.gov? Aderans is not there, nor is Follica or ICX.