Home | News | Find a Doctor | Ask a Question | Free

Intercytex joins $85m regeneration project


#1

Last Updated: 2:18am BST 18/04/2008

By Jonathan Russell

UK BIOTECH firm Intercytex is to get a share of an $85m (£42.8m) US military grant to develop regenerative treatment for wounded soldiers.

Washington is expected to announce today that it is pouring millions of dollars into finding ways of rebuilding body parts and organs. Intercytex will get a share of the funding to advance its regenerative skin graft technology.
advertisement

Nick Higgins, chief executive of Intercytex, said: "Regenerative medicine, the restoration and repair of human tissues and organs, has the potential to revolutionise the treatment of patients.

“As the only UK representative, we are immensely proud to be involved in this key initiative launched by the US government, and we are confident that we can make a significant contribution.”

Intercytex’s contribution will be directed at treating extensive burns and loss of skin suffered on the battlefield. However, it is understood the technology could also be used to treat trauma and burns in the general public.

The company will use technology aimed at getting laboratory-made living human skin to be integrated into the human body. The company claims its technology differs from other skin graft alternatives which biodegrade in a few weeks, too rapidly to act as skin grafts, says the company.

Intercytex is also developing hair and facial skin regeneration products derived from unmodified human cells. The products are designed to treat facial scarring through acne and male pattern baldness.

The company is the only British one in the newly formed US Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicines.


#2

» UK BIOTECH firm Intercytex is to get a share of an $85m (£42.8m) US
» military grant to develop regenerative treatment for wounded soldiers.

this means NOT trc, or soldiers needs hair to fight better ? :stuck_out_tongue:


#3

» » UK BIOTECH firm Intercytex is to get a share of an $85m (£42.8m) US
» » military grant to develop regenerative treatment for wounded soldiers.
»
» this means NOT trc, or soldiers needs hair to fight better ? :stuck_out_tongue:

Yeah, clearly they are interested in the skin tech to treat burns.


#4

Good news. We want all their products to do really, really well… so eventually if they’re getting enouhg $$ they’ll fund HM to the hilt and not lose such a high percentage of their subjects…


#5

they already recieved £2M for TRC and now this for their other product

it shows people have faith in them


#6

I would prefer private investors, instead of public grants.

Anyway, this is good news, and explains why ICX stocks have jumped 8% today.
http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=ICX.L&t=3m&l=on&z=m&q=l&c=

unfortunately, no money for TRC.


#7

» I would prefer private investors, instead of public grants.
»
» Anyway, this is good news, and explains why ICX stocks have jumped 8%
» today.
» http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=ICX.L&t=3m&l=on&z=m&q=l&c=
»
» unfortunately, no money for TRC.

and the article doesn’t specify what share of that grant is going to go to ICX.


#8

Now they are more concentrated on the wounded side of research they may find something like Follica:-)


#9

they mentioned the US Military initiative on engadget.com

DoD establishes institute tasked with regrowing body parts
by Donald Melanson, posted Apr 22nd 2008 at 4:04PM

Apparently not satisfied with simply building robotic body parts, the Department of Defense has now announced a brand new effort that it hopes will one day allow it to regrow actual body parts. Dubbed the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine (or AFIRM), the new group will explore the use of stem cell research, among other things, to “reconstruct new skin, muscles and tendons, and even ears, noses and fingers.” Or, as the Army surgeon general that’ll be overseeing the program puts it: if an animal like a salamander can regrow a lost tail or limb, “Why can’t a mammal do the same thing?” Not surprisingly, the institute apparently also won’t be hard up for resources, with it boasting a budget of about $250 million for its first five-year period, and it enlisting the help of three universities, including Rutgers, Wake Forest, and the University of Pittsburgh.


#10

ICX or not, it’s very good news in general that the US military is throwing that kind of money around for regenerative medicine. Because they’ll want real results. And they’ll be willing to fund the work for years with no short-term payoff if the final product is better for it.

Since it’s so closely tied to skin regeneration and also cosmetically prominent, regrowing human scalp hair will probably be one of the earlier things the work benefits. They might not directly make a project out of HM, but what gets learned about skin & healing will probably spill over.


#11

» they mentioned the US Military initiative on engadget.com
»
» DoD establishes institute tasked with regrowing body parts
» by Donald Melanson, posted Apr 22nd 2008 at 4:04PM
»
» Apparently not satisfied with simply building robotic body parts, the
» Department of Defense has now announced a brand new effort that it hopes
» will one day allow it to regrow actual body parts. Dubbed the Armed Forces
» Institute of Regenerative Medicine (or AFIRM), the new group will explore
» the use of stem cell research, among other things, to “reconstruct new
» skin, muscles and tendons, and even ears, noses and fingers.” Or, as the
» Army surgeon general that’ll be overseeing the program puts it: if an
» animal like a salamander can regrow a lost tail or limb, “Why can’t a
» mammal do the same thing?” Not surprisingly, the institute apparently also
» won’t be hard up for resources, with it boasting a budget of about $250
» million for its first five-year period, and it enlisting the help of three
» universities, including Rutgers, Wake Forest, and the University of
» Pittsburgh.

nice cut and paste job


#12

» nice cut and paste job

Why do you have to pick a fight with everybody again?


#13

check your email


#14

There’s nothing wrong with cut and paste. It’s the message that’s important, no the messenger.