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If these amateur Folica experiments start working


#1

Let’s say these attempts at the Folica method actually start sprouting some signs of new hairs.

Here’s the questions that will immediately come to everyone’s mind, long before the new hairs are even showing very much:

  1. How long do we have to wait before we can do another round of the process on the same spot as before? General skin health, recovery of the healing capabilities in the area again, etc.

  2. Existing hairs: Are they being boosted by the procedure, or not? What about freshly-made hairs that were done by the last wounding/medicating pass? Does the next pass reinforce them?


#2

I guess someone will have to try.

What I think though is that ppl will try to get better results on one go. We have seen that it is possible to get somehow ok density with just one try. Even though so far it happened only to one guy.

I don’t think it is a good idea to do it extensively several times at one spot, unless you want to grow elephant like skin there.


#3

Well, amateur experiments always work in the begining … " I can see 5 new hairs in front of my hairline that weren’t there before … well, I think so ", that would be a typical testimony, so I doubt it very much that it won’t happen in this case.


#4

But it probably WILL work to do “something” and that’s why I’m bringing it up - what really DOES happen if you repeatedly do this kind of work on one area?

Either the experimenters regrow 100% density and full-strength hairs on the first try, or else we’ll be talking about it. We don’t get 40 grafts per cm from a HT doctor and then just quit the HT game happy, do we?

Let’s face it:

We’re not hoping for HM to give us 30%, 40%, or even 60% of what we lost. As soon as we find a method that works to regrow anything at all, we’ll start trying to find the limits to getting EVERYTHING back that we’ve lost since our teens.

I don’t know enough about traditional Chemical peels to call it, but I think they’re not harmful to do several times as long as the skin really recovered from the last time, however long that took.

I think theoretically the abrasion/peeling is not supposed to be doing any scarring at all, it’s just a practical matter that some small amount of permanent damage is being done to the skin there each time.


#5

» I guess someone will have to try.
»
» What I think though is that ppl will try to get better results on one go.
» We have seen that it is possible to get somehow ok density with just one
» try. Even though so far it happened only to one guy.
When did we see this, and how can we be sure it wasn’t just a picture of a hair transplant?

»
» I don’t think it is a good idea to do it extensively several times at one
» spot, unless you want to grow elephant like skin there.


#6

» Well, amateur experiments always work in the begining … " I can see 5 new
» hairs in front of my hairline that weren’t there before … well, I think
» so ", that would be a typical testimony, so I doubt it very much that it
» won’t happen in this case.

that’s exactly the reason i don’t expect much from this…


#7

I know it’s a safer assumption to expect sparse amounts of hair than believing that it’ll regrow a ton.

But what do you REALLY base that on, though?

I think Folica’s deal is much more likely to either regrow hair like mad just as it did on the mouse/human skin samples, or else do essentially nothing at all because of some unanticipated complication on live humans. Assuming the method gets carried out correctly, I don’t see much reason to expect anything in the middle.


#8

Can you please stop bashing the people experimenting with your useless negative posts? I don’t care and neither does anyone else if you think this won’t work. All you seem to do is put down people trying new ideas…why do you care?

I normally wouldn’t give a sh*t , but I’m actually INTERESTED in what these guys are trying and don’t care about people’s useless negativity.


#9

» Can you please stop bashing the people experimenting with your useless
» negative posts? I don’t care and neither does anyone else if you think this
» won’t work. All you seem to do is put down people trying new ideas…why do
» you care?
»
» I normally wouldn’t give a sh*t , but I’m actually INTERESTED in what
» these guys are trying and don’t care about people’s useless negativity.

It’s best to ignore Baldbaby. He’s what we call a chronic pessimist.
He thinks everything will fail, but he’ll be the first in line for whatever
treatment he bashed earlier.

.


#10

(To Baldisme, I was referring to the cancer patient in several of the other current threads. The one that regrew the patch of scalp hair while taking Gentifib orally.)


#11

» 2. Existing hairs: Are they being boosted by the procedure, or
» not?
What about freshly-made hairs that were done by the last
» wounding/medicating pass? Does the next pass reinforce them?

The answer to this question is yes. I posted earlier on how wounding creates new follicles and also puts old follicles back into anagen earlier.
hh


#12

» I know it’s a safer assumption to expect sparse amounts of hair than
» believing that it’ll regrow a ton.
»
» But what do you REALLY base that on, though?
»
»
» I think Folica’s deal is much more likely to either regrow hair like mad
» just as it did on the mouse/human skin samples, or else do essentially
» nothing at all because of some unanticipated complication on live humans.
» Assuming the method gets carried out correctly, I don’t see much reason to
» expect anything in the middle.

It might work very well but have some big practical difficulties - ie the wounding procedure has to be much more vigorous than most people would prefer or the relatively affordable drug substitutes might prove not so effective when compared to lab produced relatively inaffordable peptides.
hh


#13

I agree with you that there may be practical issues we’ll see soon. But I’m just speaking in terms of hypothetical possibilities when I say I think it’ll probably either work great or not at all.

Wounding pain? Price of drugs?

Before we complain, let’s compare it to the only alternative: Trying to get 25,000+ grafts from a combination of strip and FUE transplant sessions. That ain’t cheap and it ain’t pleasant either.


#14

» » 2. Existing hairs: Are they being boosted by the procedure, or
» » not?
What about freshly-made hairs that were done by the last
» » wounding/medicating pass? Does the next pass reinforce them?
»
» The answer to this question is yes. I posted earlier on how wounding
» creates new follicles and also puts old follicles back into anagen
» earlier.
» hh

Can you give, again, the link for that study please ?


#15

» Well, amateur experiments always work in the begining … " I can see 5 new
» hairs in front of my hairline that weren’t there before … well, I think
» so ", that would be a typical testimony, so I doubt it very much that it
» won’t happen in this case.

So true :slight_smile: They always work, and then disapoint and ppl jump onto something else.

I’m hope that ppl will bring some really good photos if it really does work great.


#16

I don’t think Folica would try to market it widespread unless the capabilities are decent. A couple thousand of grafts worth at least.

Minox doesn’t do much either, but minox is an OTC topical that’s cheap to produce and doesn’t cause trouble for most users. If Folica is gonna ask people to live with a dermabraded head and expensive drugs, they’ll need some visible improvement to show for it.

Oh sure, they could sell US virutally anything. But a widespread mass market won’t pay up with that kind of money & pain & ugly-duckling period for just some tiny little gain.


#17

» Can you please stop bashing the people experimenting with your useless
» negative posts? I don’t care and neither does anyone else if you think this
» won’t work. All you seem to do is put down people trying new ideas…why do
» you care?
»
» I normally wouldn’t give a sh*t , but I’m actually INTERESTED in what
» these guys are trying and don’t care about people’s useless negativity.

i don’t mean to offend anybody, and please take note that other people here have been more negative than me.

i’m just saying that i am a bit skeptical about this wounding business, for the simple reason:

how many times have you seen a human being sustain a wound?

big wounds, small wounds, cuts, gashes, gaping holes in the skin anywhere on the body, head wounds, etc.

now, think about it: out of all those wounds you’ve seen, how many have healed and then sprouted a significant amount of hair???

i think when a wound heals and sprouts hair on top of the healed area (assuming there’s not a significant amount of scar tissue, which is very likely), that is a FLUKE, and simply not the norm.

it being a fluke, a very rare occurrence, doesn’t bode too well for this thing, i think…

even when a person gets dermabrasion, think about it – how many times does new hair sprout?

let’s see how many of these guys who dermabrade their scalps actually grow new hair.

i’m not totally skeptical about it, i think it might be the basis for some real developments. i just think it’s not as much of a “slam dunk” as a lot of people here think.


#18

» » Can you please stop bashing the people experimenting with your useless
» » negative posts? I don’t care and neither does anyone else if you think
» this
» » won’t work. All you seem to do is put down people trying new ideas…why
» do
» » you care?
» »
» » I normally wouldn’t give a sh*t , but I’m actually INTERESTED in what
» » these guys are trying and don’t care about people’s useless negativity.
»
» i don’t mean to offend anybody, and please take note that other people
» here have been more negative than me.
»
» i’m just saying that i am a bit skeptical about this wounding business,
» for the simple reason:
»
» how many times have you seen a human being sustain a wound?
»
» big wounds, small wounds, cuts, gashes, gaping holes in the skin anywhere
» on the body, head wounds, etc.
»
» now, think about it: out of all those wounds you’ve seen, how many have
» healed and then sprouted a significant amount of hair???
»
» i think when a wound heals and sprouts hair on top of the healed area
» (assuming there’s not a significant amount of scar tissue, which is very
» likely), that is a FLUKE, and simply not the norm.
»
» it being a fluke, a very rare occurrence, doesn’t bode too well for this
» thing, i think…
»
» even when a person gets dermabrasion, think about it – how many times
» does new hair sprout?
»
» let’s see how many of these guys who dermabrade their scalps actually grow
» new hair.
»
» i’m not totally skeptical about it, i think it might be the basis for some
» real developments. i just think it’s not as much of a “slam dunk” as a
» lot of people here think.

How many people have you seen after sustaining a wound or having dermabrasion have then applied an EGF-R inhibitor to their head? HTF do you know that these so called “flukes” weren’t the result of simply applying some homemade recipe to their head in which they thougth was some sort of anticeptic but actually was in fact an EGF-R inhibitor? Hey sh)t happens.


#19

Let’s just stand back and crunch some raw facts about the Folica deal for a second:

– Folica & Cotsarelis are dumping their credibility and money into this project as if it’s gonna work fine commercially pretty soon.

– The human skin samples on the mice are regrowing lots of hair.

– There’s no specific reason why it would be different on a live human except for the immunosuppression, and at least right now they don’t believe it’s relevant.

– When it comes to existing freak cases of hair regrowth, scalp skin wounding in general has been responsible for some of the best-looking cases out there. It’s been true for decades.

– That freak Gentifib regrowth patient wasn’t being immunosuppressed as far as I know.