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Ht & dht 101


#1

Hello everyone, more weird questions from Boris:

I initiated this entry under the drug forum but unfortunately it got very little attention, so perhaps it was more appropriate for me to be post it in this section

It is common knowledge that hair from the occipital and back area of the head is DHT resistant, while the one at the front, temples, etc. are not. The first question is why is this so? It seems that DHT production is associated with an oily scalp, and this oil thus appear at the part of the hair that usually undergoes the first symptoms of hair loss. If this is so, why would transplanting hair that supposedly is DHT resistant to this part of the scalp that is undergoing a constant oil production, could the hair follicale succumb and just fall off?

Another questions:

  1. Why do HT docs still prescribe Dutas, Minox after a HT if in fact the hair which has been transplanted should never experience the thinning of the hair that died and fell. An answer could be to preserve the hair that is not DHT resistant, but still are there other answers for this?

  2. This question is from before, why is DHT produced primarily in the areas that undergo the first signs of hairloss always, as opposed to the back and occipital area of the head. What I am trying to get at, is whether a HT would clearly resolve the problem unless you take Dutas or a similar drug forever.

Cheers


#2

» Hello everyone, more weird questions from Boris:
»
» I initiated this entry under the drug forum but unfortunately it got very
» little attention, so perhaps it was more appropriate for me to be post it
» in this section
»
» It is common knowledge that hair from the occipital and back area of the
» head is DHT resistant, while the one at the front, temples, etc. are not.
» The first question is why is this so? It seems that DHT production is
» associated with an oily scalp, and this oil thus appear at the part of the
» hair that usually undergoes the first symptoms of hair loss. If this is
» so, why would transplanting hair that supposedly is DHT resistant to this
» part of the scalp that is undergoing a constant oil production, could the
» hair follicale succumb and just fall off?
»
» Another questions:
» 1. Why do HT docs still prescribe Dutas, Minox after a HT if in fact the
» hair which has been transplanted should never experience the thinning of
» the hair that died and fell. An answer could be to preserve the hair that
» is not DHT resistant, but still are there other answers for this?

There is no guarantee. It’s just buying insurance, better to have in case the hairs fall out.


#3

It s all a guessing game. There s no guarantee that the doctor will pick the DHT resistant hair each and every single time. If the pick donor that are not dht resisitant, you are screwed.


#4

No such thing as permanent hair. Tons of 60 yr olds I have seen have no donor hair.


#5

» Hello everyone, more weird questions from Boris:
»
» I initiated this entry under the drug forum but unfortunately it got very
» little attention, so perhaps it was more appropriate for me to be post it
» in this section
»
» It is common knowledge that hair from the occipital and back area of the
» head is DHT resistant, while the one at the front, temples, etc. are not.
» The first question is why is this so? It seems that DHT production is
» associated with an oily scalp, and this oil thus appear at the part of the
» hair that usually undergoes the first symptoms of hair loss. If this is
» so, why would transplanting hair that supposedly is DHT resistant to this
» part of the scalp that is undergoing a constant oil production, could the
» hair follicale succumb and just fall off?
»
» Another questions:
» 1. Why do HT docs still prescribe Dutas, Minox after a HT if in fact the
» hair which has been transplanted should never experience the thinning of
» the hair that died and fell. An answer could be to preserve the hair that
» is not DHT resistant, but still are there other answers for this?
»
» 2. This question is from before, why is DHT produced primarily in the
» areas that undergo the first signs of hairloss always, as opposed to the
» back and occipital area of the head. What I am trying to get at, is
» whether a HT would clearly resolve the problem unless you take Dutas or a
» similar drug forever.
»
» Cheers

Good questions. Don’t have all the answers. I don’t even think the doctors know why hair in the back and sides of the head tend to be more permanent than others.

I had my first hair transplant over 10 years ago. The hair still growing strong like before. I have also met many hair transplant patients over the years. I do believe that the grafts do stay for a very long time whether you use Dutas/Minox/Finas or not.

While some may suggest that using a good regimen will keep the grafts alive and well, more importantly I think that is to preserve the rest of your existing hair so that you don’t have to keep getting a hair transplant every 2-3 years.


#6

Minox is prescribed by many HT surgeons following surgery to assist in regrowth of the transplanted follicles and has nothing to do with a traditional, long-term topical treatment for hair loss. I have heard some say that “you can stop using the Minox when the grafts begin to grow hairs”. I believe (but don’t quote me) that the minox is used to assist at re-vascularization of the follicles once transplanted.

As far as Propecia (the only other drug that I have ever heard a transplant surgeon prescribe), I beleive that it is intended as an adjuvant treatment - like “why not use it and attempt to save some of your existing hair, or at least slow down the progression of MPB?”