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How about hair from a cadaver?


#1

This news story demonstrates that they could transplant a cadaver’s scalp to your head:


#2

What about that doctor who transplanted a single follicle of his wife’s hair, to his arm?

I seem to remember reading that the human body does not reject transplanted individual hair follicles from another person.

So it might be possible to use something like FUE to transplant individual hair follicles from another person–a living donor or a freshly dead donor–without the need for any kind of immune suppressing drugs.


#3

It was Dr. Jahoda and he actually transplanted hos dissociated DP cells, not a follicle, into his wife’s a. It grew into follicles that had cells with both his own DNA and his wife’s.


#4

Really, when I brought up hair from a cadaver I was talking about how the burnt fireman
went from bald to having a full head of hair since he got a cadaver’s scalp and face. I
guess that means we could get a cadaver’s scalp if a doctor would do it and if we would
do it. But I really don’t think this is going to be necessary and I surely wouldn’t do
it. I think that between Samumed (SM04554) and Shiseido (iPS cells) we will be able to
recover a good amount of hair in just a few years. Some other research teams may also
be close to revolutionary treatments as well. I think hair loss is almost cured. So none
of you need to go grave-robbing.


#5

As far as I know the recipient of such an extensive tissue or organ tramsplant would have to be on strong immunosupressant medicines the rest of his life. Whereas it was found that dissociated DP cells (and keratinocytes, I believe) transplanted from one person to another by themselves are NOT enough to trigger an immune host response.


#6

As jarjarbinx and I said above, Jahoda did it without the need for immunosuppressant drugs.

But in that case I think the trick is to only transplant the hair follicles or just the cells from the hair follicles AND NO IMMUNOSUPRESSANT DRUGS ARE NEEDED!

I seem to remember reading something about the fact that either hair follicles or the cells from hair follicles, when transplanted from one person to another, do NOT trigger an immune reaction.

So why is no one doing this except for that one hair Jahoda did it with?

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
As far as I know the recipient of such an extensive tissue or organ tramsplant would have to be on strong immunosupressant medicines the rest of his life. Whereas it was found that dissociated DP cells (and keratinocytes, I believe) transplanted from one person to another by themselves are NOT enough to trigger an immune host response.[/quote]


#7

I’d take a transplanted scalp, depending on the downside to it, side effect from any drugs, etc, and the possibility of worse disfigurement if the transplant doesn’t take.


#8

Isn’t all that what I just said in my post?


#9

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
It was Dr. Jahoda and he actually transplanted hos dissociated DP cells, not a follicle, into his wife’s a. It grew into follicles that had cells with both his own DNA and his wife’s.[/quote]

And of course if they transplanted an entire cadaver scalp to your head then you would need immune suppressing drugs but why can’t they instead just harvest all of the immune privileged DP cells from a cadaver’s head and inject that into your head? If they took ALL of these specific immune privileged cells from the cadaver’s head and transplanted them to your head then that would be a lot of cells so there wouldn’t be any need for culturing them to get a sufficient amount and since there would be no culturing there would be no loss of hair inductivity.


#10

Like any kind of post-mortem organ donation, it would be subject to the consent of the deceased given during his or her lifetime.


#11

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
Like any kind of post-mortem organ donation, it would be subject to the consent of the deceased given during his or her lifetime.[/quote]

But it could cure hair loss, right? And they wouldn’t have to figure out a solution to
the hair inductivity problem in order to do this, right? And taking ALL of the DP cells
from a cadaver would secure a large amount of the DP cells, right? And if you start out
with a large amount of these cells by taking ALL of them from the cadaver donor then you
even if you had to do some culturing of these cells you would probably only need to do one
or two culture passes to produce a huge amount of these DP cells, right? And one or two
culture passes would probably not be enough culture passes to cause a big loss of hair
inductivity, right? And these DP cells are immune privileged so there would be no issue
of rejection, right?

My point is that didn’t Jahoda’s experiment with his wife cells injected into his own arm
prove that what I’m suggesting would cure hair loss?


#12

You won’t need no stinkin’ paperwork if you wait until it gets dark and use a shovel,

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
Like any kind of post-mortem organ donation, it would be subject to the consent of the deceased given during his or her lifetime.[/quote]


#13

wow, you guys must be reaaaally really desperate.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
Like any kind of post-mortem organ donation, it would be subject to the consent of the deceased given during his or her lifetime.

[postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]

But it could cure hair loss, right? And they wouldn’t have to figure out a solution to
the hair inductivity problem in order to do this, right? And taking ALL of the DP cells
from a cadaver would secure a large amount of the DP cells, right? And if you start out
with a large amount of these cells by taking ALL of them from the cadaver donor then you
even if you had to do some culturing of these cells you would probably only need to do one
or two culture passes to produce a huge amount of these DP cells, right? And one or two
culture passes would probably not be enough culture passes to cause a big loss of hair
inductivity, right? And these DP cells are immune privileged so there would be no issue
of rejection, right?

My point is that didn’t Jahoda’s experiment with his wife cells injected into his own arm
prove that what I’m suggesting would cure hair loss?[/quote]


#14

Wow, you must really be in denial.

[quote]wow, you guys must be reaaaally really desperate.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
Like any kind of post-mortem organ donation, it would be subject to the consent of the deceased given during his or her lifetime.

[postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]

But it could cure hair loss, right? And they wouldn’t have to figure out a solution to
the hair inductivity problem in order to do this, right? And taking ALL of the DP cells
from a cadaver would secure a large amount of the DP cells, right? And if you start out
with a large amount of these cells by taking ALL of them from the cadaver donor then you
even if you had to do some culturing of these cells you would probably only need to do one
or two culture passes to produce a huge amount of these DP cells, right? And one or two
culture passes would probably not be enough culture passes to cause a big loss of hair
inductivity, right? And these DP cells are immune privileged so there would be no issue
of rejection, right?

My point is that didn’t Jahoda’s experiment with his wife cells injected into his own arm
prove that what I’m suggesting would cure hair loss?

[postedby]Originally Posted by hairman2[/postedby][/quote]


#15

I wonder why this isn’t being offered by some clinic in someplace like Mexico?

It doesn’t have to come from a cadaver, either. They could take it from a living person, especially one with plenty of hair to spare, who might be paid to donate the necessary cells.

And if the hair would match, maybe it could be taken from an animal?

Don’t be shocked–we’ve been putting pig valves from pig hearts into people for a long time now.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
Like any kind of post-mortem organ donation, it would be subject to the consent of the deceased given during his or her lifetime.

[postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]

But it could cure hair loss, right? And they wouldn’t have to figure out a solution to
the hair inductivity problem in order to do this, right? And taking ALL of the DP cells
from a cadaver would secure a large amount of the DP cells, right? And if you start out
with a large amount of these cells by taking ALL of them from the cadaver donor then you
even if you had to do some culturing of these cells you would probably only need to do one
or two culture passes to produce a huge amount of these DP cells, right? And one or two
culture passes would probably not be enough culture passes to cause a big loss of hair
inductivity, right? And these DP cells are immune privileged so there would be no issue
of rejection, right?

My point is that didn’t Jahoda’s experiment with his wife cells injected into his own arm
prove that what I’m suggesting would cure hair loss?[/quote]


#16

I just realized that the pilofocus instrument or something like it could enable living donors to donate the cells or whole follicles without having any scarring afterward.

Maybe even people who need hair removed could have it removed this way and immediately transplanted to our heads. And we’d be paying for the cells or follicles by paying for the donor’s hair removal instead.


#17

[quote]I wonder why this isn’t being offered by some clinic in someplace like Mexico?

It doesn’t have to come from a cadaver, either. They could take it from a living person, especially one with plenty of hair to spare, who might be paid to donate the necessary cells.

And if the hair would match, maybe it could be taken from an animal?

Don’t be shocked–we’ve been putting pig valves from pig hearts into people for a long time now.[/quote]

Good point about the living person, yes, it could be done, I thought of that too. As for cadavers, even Mexico has laws. Remember how fast they cracked down on Dr. Bazan when they found out he was doing HT surgery but wasn’t qualified as a surgeon, only a regular MD.

As far as an animal, I think no. First of all, would you want dog fur growing on your head? Second, I think the differences between animal and human tissues are so fundamental that it would kick off an immune host response, even though DP cells are normally considered immune privileged.


#18

If such a treatment became available I would consider it.

One more positive thing about the idea that I didn’t mention is that Jahoda’s experiment showed that the new follicles contained his wife’s genes and his own genes, which means that characteristics of the new hair might not stray far from the hair you already have because some of your own hair genes would be in the new hair, plus doctors could harvest cells from donors who’s hair is similar in characteristics to the recipient patient’s hair.

Look at all the positives:

  1. You wouldn’t need to solve the lost hair inductivity problem.

  2. The new hair could look and act a lot like your already existing hair, and with styling techniques (such as blow-drying) it might be possible to make your new hair blend in perfectly with your already existing hair.

  3. The implanted cells are immune privileged.

If this was available I would consider it. Lots of people would. I’m not talking about transplanting a whole cadaver scalp to someone’s head, although that was done for the firefighter patient. I’m just talking about harvesting the right cells from the cadaver donor scalp and implanting those cells into living bald people. We are already harvesting cadaverous donor tissue for numerous medical purposes.

I think that if the dermatologists were to try it, and if the results were excellent for all patients, huge numbers of people would pay for the treatment. The customer traffic would start out a trickle but it would quickly turn into a stampede. It wouldn’t be long before you would be standing in the line.

[quote]wow, you guys must be reaaaally really desperate.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
Like any kind of post-mortem organ donation, it would be subject to the consent of the deceased given during his or her lifetime.

[postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]

But it could cure hair loss, right? And they wouldn’t have to figure out a solution to
the hair inductivity problem in order to do this, right? And taking ALL of the DP cells
from a cadaver would secure a large amount of the DP cells, right? And if you start out
with a large amount of these cells by taking ALL of them from the cadaver donor then you
even if you had to do some culturing of these cells you would probably only need to do one
or two culture passes to produce a huge amount of these DP cells, right? And one or two
culture passes would probably not be enough culture passes to cause a big loss of hair
inductivity, right? And these DP cells are immune privileged so there would be no issue
of rejection, right?

My point is that didn’t Jahoda’s experiment with his wife cells injected into his own arm
prove that what I’m suggesting would cure hair loss?

[postedby]Originally Posted by hairman2[/postedby][/quote]


#19

You could use a live person’s cells and cells from cadavers too. There would be huge demand for a treatment like this and you would need a lot of donor material.

[quote]I wonder why this isn’t being offered by some clinic in someplace like Mexico?

It doesn’t have to come from a cadaver, either. They could take it from a living person, especially one with plenty of hair to spare, who might be paid to donate the necessary cells.

And if the hair would match, maybe it could be taken from an animal?

Don’t be shocked–we’ve been putting pig valves from pig hearts into people for a long time now.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
Like any kind of post-mortem organ donation, it would be subject to the consent of the deceased given during his or her lifetime.

[postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]

But it could cure hair loss, right? And they wouldn’t have to figure out a solution to
the hair inductivity problem in order to do this, right? And taking ALL of the DP cells
from a cadaver would secure a large amount of the DP cells, right? And if you start out
with a large amount of these cells by taking ALL of them from the cadaver donor then you
even if you had to do some culturing of these cells you would probably only need to do one
or two culture passes to produce a huge amount of these DP cells, right? And one or two
culture passes would probably not be enough culture passes to cause a big loss of hair
inductivity, right? And these DP cells are immune privileged so there would be no issue
of rejection, right?

My point is that didn’t Jahoda’s experiment with his wife cells injected into his own arm
prove that what I’m suggesting would cure hair loss?

[postedby]Originally Posted by Ahab[/postedby][/quote]


#20

[quote]I wonder why this isn’t being offered by some clinic in someplace like Mexico?

It doesn’t have to come from a cadaver, either. They could take it from a living person, especially one with plenty of hair to spare, who might be paid to donate the necessary cells.

And if the hair would match, maybe it could be taken from an animal?

Don’t be shocked–we’ve been putting pig valves from pig hearts into people for a long time now.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]

Good point about the living person, yes, it could be done, I thought of that too. As for cadavers, even Mexico has laws. Remember how fast they cracked down on Dr. Bazan when they found out he was doing HT surgery but wasn’t qualified as a surgeon, only a regular MD.

As far as an animal, I think no. First of all, would you want dog fur growing on your head? Second, I think the differences between animal and human tissues are so fundamental that it would kick off an immune host response, even though DP cells are normally considered immune privileged.[/quote]

If you get the hair cells from living persons only you would have to deal with huge shortages of donor material. If you use cadaverous cells and cells from living people you would have a better supply of donor material. The demand for such a treatment would be huge.