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Hogan - Spirulina


#1

Hogan:

Can you recommend a good spirulina supplement? What dosage?

Jtelecom


#2

» Hogan:
»
» Can you recommend a good spirulina supplement? What dosage?
»
» Jtelecom

There are only a couple that I would trust. The first one is from Cyanotech in Hawaii. The second one that I taking now is called Earth Rise out of California.

As far as dosage, I can only recommend that you follow dosage on the bottle (or pete will bitch). However, many times I take about twice as much as they recommend on a daily basis which is about 10 grams.

Thanks,

Hogan


#3

Thank you


#4

What does Spirulina do ?


#5

#6

» » Hogan:
» »
» » Can you recommend a good spirulina supplement? What dosage?
» »
» » Jtelecom
»
» There are only a couple that I would trust. The first one is from
» Cyanotech in Hawaii. The second one that I taking now is called Earth
» Rise out of California.
»
» As far as dosage, I can only recommend that you follow dosage on the
» bottle (or pete will bitch). However, many times I take about twice as
» much as they recommend on a daily basis which is about 10 grams.
»
» Thanks,
»
» Hogan

How do you determine which spirulina you trust? I will probably take what you take to try it out. I trust NSI brand but I really don’t know why I trust any of the brands I take.

I’m going to call NSI and ask where their algae is grown. If it isn’t grown stateside then I will switch to the CA grown stuff you are taking since they have it on vitacost.

Here is a list of spirulina sources:
http://www.spirulinasource.com/algaelinks.html

I would probably test westernized/modern countries like Japan, Germany, etc as well.


#7

man, when i lived in Cali I drank a shake of that stuff and crapped for three days, horrific cramps and pain…

not that I am saying not to use it, it is some of the best stuff on earth, I believe a half teaspoon gives you the same amount of protien as like a 1/4 pound burger with none of the bad crap…

but for many the first time you use it it clenses out your colon and gives you horrible dirahea for a few days…and for me I could not leave 10 feet of the toilet for three days…


#8

Geez, here’s what I copied from that wikipedia site, this stuff seems to have everything in it, some kind of superfoods, but they never mentioned anything about cleansing your guts,

Protein
Spirulina contains unusually high amounts of protein, between 55 and 77% by dry weight, depending upon the source. It is a complete protein, containing all essential amino acids, though with reduced amounts of methionine, cysteine, and lysine, as compared to standard proteins such as that from meat, eggs, or milk. It is, however, superior to all standard plant protein, such as that from legumes.[6][7]

Essential Fatty Acids

Spirulina tabletsSpirulina is rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and also provides alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), linoleic acid (LA), stearidonic acid (SDA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA).[7][8]

Vitamins
Spirulina contains vitamin B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (nicotinamide), B6 (pyridoxine), B9 (folic acid), B12 (cyanocobalamin), vitamin C, vitamin D, and vitamin E.[7][8] The bioavailability of vitamin B12 in Spirulina is in dispute. Several biological assays have been used to test for the presence of vitamin B12.[9] The most popular is the US Pharmacopeia method using the Lactobacillus leichmannii assay. Studies using this method have shown Spirulina to be a minimal source of bioavailable vitamin B12.[10] However, this assay does not differentiate between true B12 (cobalamin) and similar compounds (corrinoids) that cannot be used in human metabolism. Cyanotech, a grower of spirulina, claims to have done a more recent assay, which has shown Spirulina to be a significant source of cobalamin. However the assay is not published for scientific review and so the existence of this assay is in doubt.[11]

Minerals
Spirulina is a rich source of potassium, and also contains calcium, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, selenium, sodium, and zinc.[7][8]

Photosynthetic Pigments
Spirulina contains many pigments including chlorophyll-a, xanthophyll, beta-carotene, echinenone, myxoxanthophyll, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, diatoxanthin, 3’-hydroxyechinenone, beta-cryptoxanthin, oscillaxanthin, plus the phycobiliproteins c-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin.[1]

Evidence of health and healing effects
Advocates frequently overstate their claims of Spirulina’s health and healing properties, though often there is research upon which such claims are based. Conversely, health food detractors often dismiss all such claims without acknowledging existing research. Two online publications exemplify these opposing positions, respectively: Superfoods For Optimum Health: Chlorella and Spirulina, and Wellness Letter on Blue Green Algae. Many positive claims are based on research done on individual nutrients that Spirulina contains, such as GLA, various antioxidants, etc., rather than on direct research using Spirulina. What follows is research on the health and healing effects of Spirulina. In vitro research may suggest the possibility of similar results in humans, but cannot be taken as proof of human effects. Animal research provides stronger evidence, but again, does not represent proof of similar effects in humans. The results of Clinical trials are the best evidence available.

In vitro research
Spirulina extract inhibits HIV replication in human T-cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and Langerhans cells.[12]

Animal research
Spirulina helps prevent heart damage caused by chemotherapy using Doxorubicin, without interfering with its anti-tumor activity.[13] Spirulina reduces the severity of strokes and improves recovery of movement after a stroke;[14] reverses age-related declines in memory and learning;[15] and prevents and treats hay fever.[16]

Clinical trials
Spirulina is effective for the clinical improvement of melanosis and keratosis due to chronic arsenic poisoning;[17] improves weight-gain and corrects anemia in both HIV-infected and HIV-negative undernourished children;[18] and protects against hay fever.[19]


#9

It is amazing stuff, noway around it…all those sea vegtables are amazing…again the Asian diet at it’s best…not everyone gets the horrific clence I got, but many man do…i have heard many others who went what I went through…and trust me you cannot go 10 feet from a bathroom…for me it was for 3 days straight…

honestly, it was one of the worst experiences of my life…but once it is over it is over…

» Geez, here’s what I copied from that wikipedia site, this stuff seems to
» have everything in it, some kind of superfoods, but they never mentioned
» anything about cleansing your guts,
»
»
» Protein
» Spirulina contains unusually high amounts of protein, between 55 and 77%
» by dry weight, depending upon the source. It is a complete protein,
» containing all essential amino acids, though with reduced amounts of
» methionine, cysteine, and lysine, as compared to standard proteins such as
» that from meat, eggs, or milk. It is, however, superior to all standard
» plant protein, such as that from legumes.[6][7]
»
»
» Essential Fatty Acids
»
» Spirulina tabletsSpirulina is rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and also
» provides alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), linoleic acid (LA), stearidonic acid
» (SDA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and
» arachidonic acid (AA).[7][8]
»
» Vitamins
» Spirulina contains vitamin B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3
» (nicotinamide), B6 (pyridoxine), B9 (folic acid), B12 (cyanocobalamin),
» vitamin C, vitamin D, and vitamin E.[7][8] The bioavailability of vitamin
» B12 in Spirulina is in dispute. Several biological assays have been used
» to test for the presence of vitamin B12.[9] The most popular is the US
» Pharmacopeia method using the Lactobacillus leichmannii assay. Studies
» using this method have shown Spirulina to be a minimal source of
» bioavailable vitamin B12.[10] However, this assay does not differentiate
» between true B12 (cobalamin) and similar compounds (corrinoids) that
» cannot be used in human metabolism. Cyanotech, a grower of spirulina,
» claims to have done a more recent assay, which has shown Spirulina to be a
» significant source of cobalamin. However the assay is not published for
» scientific review and so the existence of this assay is in doubt.[11]
»
»
» Minerals
» Spirulina is a rich source of potassium, and also contains calcium,
» chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, selenium,
» sodium, and zinc.[7][8]
»
»
» Photosynthetic Pigments
» Spirulina contains many pigments including chlorophyll-a, xanthophyll,
» beta-carotene, echinenone, myxoxanthophyll, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin,
» diatoxanthin, 3’-hydroxyechinenone, beta-cryptoxanthin, oscillaxanthin,
» plus the phycobiliproteins c-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin.[1]
»
»
» Evidence of health and healing effects
» Advocates frequently overstate their claims of Spirulina’s health and
» healing properties, though often there is research upon which such claims
» are based. Conversely, health food detractors often dismiss all such
» claims without acknowledging existing research. Two online publications
» exemplify these opposing positions, respectively: Superfoods For Optimum
» Health: Chlorella and Spirulina, and Wellness Letter on Blue Green Algae.
» Many positive claims are based on research done on individual nutrients
» that Spirulina contains, such as GLA, various antioxidants, etc., rather
» than on direct research using Spirulina. What follows is research on the
» health and healing effects of Spirulina. In vitro research may suggest the
» possibility of similar results in humans, but cannot be taken as proof of
» human effects. Animal research provides stronger evidence, but again, does
» not represent proof of similar effects in humans. The results of Clinical
» trials are the best evidence available.
»
» In vitro research
» Spirulina extract inhibits HIV replication in human T-cells, peripheral
» blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and Langerhans cells.[12]
»
» Animal research
» Spirulina helps prevent heart damage caused by chemotherapy using
» Doxorubicin, without interfering with its anti-tumor activity.[13]
» Spirulina reduces the severity of strokes and improves recovery of
» movement after a stroke;[14] reverses age-related declines in memory and
» learning;[15] and prevents and treats hay fever.[16]
»
» Clinical trials
» Spirulina is effective for the clinical improvement of melanosis and
» keratosis due to chronic arsenic poisoning;[17] improves weight-gain and
» corrects anemia in both HIV-infected and HIV-negative undernourished
» children;[18] and protects against hay fever.[19]


#10

Here is my reply back from NSI:

        I am writing in regards to your reply, our Spriulina comes from in some lakes, particularly those rich in salts, in Central and South America, and Africa. They are also grown in outdoor tanks specifically to be harvested for nutritional supplements. Please feel free to contact us anytime.

I will not be using them anymore and I’ll switch to an American grown one even though it costs more.