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Histogen in 2 years in asia?


#1

http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd


#2

» http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd

Could you post the story? I’m worried about registering to that site, it looks like it may be australian.


#3

» http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd

Grrreat find,very interesting.

Roll on HM


#4

» » http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd
»
»
» Could you post the story? I’m worried about registering to that site, it
» looks like it may be australian.

Just click it,stop being silly.You will find it very interesting,but saying that perhaps you won’t - I just looked at all 8 postings you’ve left,not one on a serious note,so why bother!


#5

» http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd

She says Histogen has “the potential to treat cancer”. But I am still waiting for the Q&A session. Bad way to get the funding she needs.


#6

» » » http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd
» »
» »
» » Could you post the story? I’m worried about registering to that site,
» it
» » looks like it may be australian.
»
» Just click it,stop being silly.You will find it very interesting,but
» saying that perhaps you won’t - I just looked at all 8 postings you’ve
» left,not one on a serious note,so why bother!

In all seriousness all I get is this:

For Gail Naughton, one of the most exciting things about her company Histogen’s recent clinical trial is just how fast they’re seeing results.
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#7

» » » » http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd
» » »
» » »
» » » Could you post the story? I’m worried about registering to that site,
» » it
» » » looks like it may be australian.
» »
» » Just click it,stop being silly.You will find it very interesting,but
» » saying that perhaps you won’t - I just looked at all 8 postings you’ve
» » left,not one on a serious note,so why bother!
»
»
» In all seriousness all I get is this:
»
» For Gail Naughton, one of the most exciting things about her company
» Histogen’s recent clinical trial is just how fast they’re seeing results.
» Advertisement
»
» TO CONTINUE READING, SUBSCRIBE NOW >>
» OR
»
» LOG IN TO YOUR ACCOUNT
»
»
» There’s no free online subscription option either.

Opps I’m sorry mate you are correct,but when I clicked it earlier it came up with the full page,the full story without me having to subscibe.


#8

» » http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd
»
» Grrreat find,very interesting.
»
» Roll on HM

How many docs have claimed that a marketable product was just around the corner? They ALL do it, and they all do it for the same reason: to raise funds. That’s all this is. Histogen’s product looks promising, but this hyperbole is disheartening.


#9

» http://www.sddt.com/news/article.cfm?SourceCode=20091029crd

for all those who are having problems retrieving this article, here it is:

<
Histogen exec sees growing promise in stem cell technology
By ELIZABETH MALLOY
Thursday, October 29, 2009

For Gail Naughton, one of the most exciting things about her company Histogen’s recent clinical trial is just how fast they’re seeing results.
The trial, conducted in South America, is for a hair re-growth treatment. Looking at pictures of patient samples, the before and after differences are easy to see.
“You don’t have to be a hair expert to see there are hairs where there were not (before) and they’re thicker hairs,” Naughton said, looking at photos of patients who received Histogen’s hair re-growth treatment in South America. "One injection, we were able to increase it by 100 new hairs."
Hair regrowth is just one of the possible treatments Histogen hopes to generate with its stem cell technology. The company also has the potential to grow new organ cells, nerve cells in the spine, even treat cancer. But Naughton said hair treatments would have a huge initial market, which can bring in funding for other more serious conditions.
“Hair can really generate a lot of excitement and help us raise the cash we need to develop the other products,” she said.
Histogen’s chairwoman and chief executive, Naughton is somewhat of a rarity in that she is both a scientist and a businesswoman. She is working to make this less of a rarity in her other job – as dean of San Diego State University’s College of Business Administration. There, she has helped develop a joint Ph.D. and MBA program that will teach more scientists business skills, and vice versa.

Gail Naughton
A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Naughton was a scientist first, only learning the business side when she started her first company, Advanced Tissue Sciences Inc., in 1991. The technology Histogen is based on is from Naughton’s own research.
While Histogen can be considered a stem cell company, the treatments the company is working on uses a protein secreted by stem cells, rather than the actual cells themselves. The company gets the protein using a unique strategy.
“The whole premise of Histogen is that if you go and grow human cells under conditions that are embryonic-like, the cells will revert back, and become embryonic,” she explained.
One of the advantages scientists have long seen with embryonic stem cells is that they secrete a kind of protein called WNT proteins. These are the proteins that signal to cells how to differentiate, or turn into the various muscle, bone, organ and blood cells they should grow into.
Researchesr believed that they could isolate WNT proteins and use them to stimulate tissue growth and regrow things like organs, skin and hair.
Naughton’s discovery with Histogen, which was based on other researchers’ work, was that by growing cells in an embryonic environment – low-gravity and low-oxygen – within a few days, the cells would revert to their embronic state. This means the company could get WNT proteins without having to drestroy actual embryoes.
“We’re not the basic, ‘A-ha!’ discovery research (company),” she explained. "We’re there saying, ‘We know the composition of what we have, we know what’s unique about it, let’s go to the literature and see what other people have found to be important with these and let’s go after the therapuetic areas, which are our greatest need right now.’"
While it conducts research on different therapuetic treatments, Histogen has products on the market which help generate some cashflow, though not enough to fully fund the company yet. The company sells a stem cell product, and is awaiting FDA approval for a wound care product.
The hair product could be on the market in Asia within the next two years.
Histogen has suffered some setbacks in the last year. The company had 38 employees until last January, when it was hit with a lawsuit over patent infrigement. Histogen had to lay most of the staff off, but still has 11 full-time employees. Naughton said that after another round of fundraising, they hope to begin rehiring.
The company is currently raising money to expand its hair re-growth trial in Asia.
As both the executive officer of Histogen and the dean of SDSU’s business school, Naughton acknowledged that she’s a very busy woman. She works about seven days a week, whether it’s raising venture funding for the company, reading up on new possibilities for WNT proteins or creating international studies programs for her business students. Still, she said, she wouldn’t have it any other way.
“By being able to be involved with both, I keep myself at a good balance,” she said. “I love what I do.”
<<<<<<<<<<<<<


#10

I mostly agree with fckhrlss.

“They are seeking additional funding” and “It could be on the market very soon” in the same article? That’s pretty much a message yelled through a bullhorn that they’re exaggerating how fast it’s coming.

But for what it’s worth, I will say that TWO YEARS is a lofty claim even for the HM research field.


#11

» I mostly agree with fckhrlss.
»
» “They are seeking additional funding” and “It could be on the market very
» soon” in the same article? That’s pretty much a message yelled through a
» bullhorn that they’re exaggerating how fast it’s coming.
»
»
»
» But for what it’s worth, I will say that TWO YEARS is a lofty claim even
» for the HM research field.

it could be in the market, in 2 years… it could treat cancer, etc… thats amazing!!..but they don’t have money. how is that possible? are investors dumb?
(sarcasm)


#12

I saw that article posted on xconomy yesterday, I mentioned in another thread on here about one of the posters on there who’s good at finding out any information about what’s going on. Anyway he was talking to Histogen about making an investment with them and this is what they told him.

They said they were finalizing a deal with a big funding partner where they would get a large investment before the end of November and then a second payment by the end of January. Funding has been the holdup. This would allow them to begin their Asian clinical trial in the first quarter of 2010. They said they expected they would have Asian approval, assuming the efficacy they have seen to date in main continues,

They plan on doing contract manufacturing of HSC in Singapore so that might be the ultimate destination. The funding deal is supposed to be finalized by tomorrow. They also said that they have an agreement with their insurance company to cover up to 3 mil in costs associated with the lawsuit. So it sounds like most of the obstacles in their way have been removed


#13

If it’s just a series of injections presumably there’d be little to no recovery required. You could work a stop to Singapore into a trip and get it done.


#14

» If it’s just a series of injections presumably there’d be little to no
» recovery required. You could work a stop to Singapore into a trip and get
» it done.

My only question about this really is does it continue to grow more hair the more injections you get?

Because I’ll give them that the photos they showed did display some regrowth and definite thickening of existing hair, but if that’s where it caps off … then it’s really not that useful.

If you can keep adding 100 new hairs every injection though … of course that would be a pretty good deal.


#15

» I saw that article posted on xconomy yesterday, I mentioned in another
» thread on here about one of the posters on there who’s good at finding out
» any information about what’s going on. Anyway he was talking to Histogen
» about making an investment with them and this is what they told him.
»
»
»
» They said they were finalizing a deal with a big funding
» partner where they would get a large investment before the end of November
» and then a second payment by the end of January. Funding has been the
» holdup. This would allow them to begin their Asian clinical trial in the
» first quarter of 2010. They said they expected they would have Asian
» approval, assuming the efficacy they have seen to date in main continues,
»
»
» They plan on doing contract manufacturing of HSC in Singapore so that
» might be the ultimate destination. The funding deal is supposed to be
» finalized by tomorrow. They also said that they have an agreement with
» their insurance company to cover up to 3 mil in costs associated with the
» lawsuit. So it sounds like most of the obstacles in their way have been
» removed

Solve the problem first and then come and ask for my money! Not the other way around. And the fact that they ever utter the word cancer makes this even less credible. Hogwash I’d say.


#16

Thanks Dogstar. These look like good news. Lets see how it goes.

» I saw that article posted on xconomy yesterday, I mentioned in another
» thread on here about one of the posters on there who’s good at finding out
» any information about what’s going on. Anyway he was talking to Histogen
» about making an investment with them and this is what they told him.
»
»
»
» They said they were finalizing a deal with a big funding
» partner where they would get a large investment before the end of November
» and then a second payment by the end of January. Funding has been the
» holdup. This would allow them to begin their Asian clinical trial in the
» first quarter of 2010. They said they expected they would have Asian
» approval, assuming the efficacy they have seen to date in main continues,
»
»
» They plan on doing contract manufacturing of HSC in Singapore so that
» might be the ultimate destination. The funding deal is supposed to be
» finalized by tomorrow. They also said that they have an agreement with
» their insurance company to cover up to 3 mil in costs associated with the
» lawsuit. So it sounds like most of the obstacles in their way have been
» removed


#17

My only question about this really is does it continue to grow more hair the more injections you get?

Because I’ll give them that the photos they showed did display some regrowth and definite thickening of existing hair, but if that’s where it caps off … then it’s really not that useful.

If you can keep adding 100 new hairs every injection though … of course that would be a pretty good deal.

Exactly.

There are numerous things that have caused a one-time boost of growth to existing hairs.

But the million-dollar problem is getting continued sessions to each cause another boost of similar magnitude as the first one. Then the patient can start compounding the results into something cosmetically significant.


#18

(bumping roger_that’s threads off the bottom of the page)


#19

latest news from xconomy.

Note in the article of this thread, that Naughton speculated with an Asian launch in 2011-2012 (even sooner that the 2013 launch he mentioned in a video interview).
Well, this 2011-2012 launch is now clearly impossible.


jay

7/12/10 8:15 am

latest email i received from histogen

Thank you for your continued interest. Histogen’s current efforts are focused on preparations for the clinical trial in Singapore, to begin in February 2011. We are also developing our clinical trial plan for the U.S. and Europe, although it is likely we will not have additional information to share on these plans until the end of this year. We look forward to keeping you informed as plans for the trials, and subject recruiting, progress



#20

Would they have to start over for clinical trials in the U.S. and Europe or could they include previous phases held in Asia? Obviously there would be further hoops to jump through, but would they be submission related or new trial related?

latest news from xconomy.
»
» Note in the article of this thread, that Naughton speculated with an Asian
» launch in 2011-2012 (even sooner that the 2013 launch he mentioned in a
» video interview).
» Well, this 2011-2012 launch is now clearly impossible.
»
» -------------
» # jay
» 7/12/10 8:15 am
»
» latest email i received from histogen
»
» Thank you for your continued interest. Histogen’s current efforts are
» focused on preparations for the clinical trial in Singapore, to begin in
» February 2011. We are also developing our clinical trial plan for the U.S.
» and Europe, although it is likely we will not have additional information
» to share on these plans until the end of this year. We look forward to
» keeping you informed as plans for the trials, and subject recruiting,
» progress
»
» -------