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Hair multiplication using beard hair, doctors already doing it


#21

» What I said was that the claims are not valid. They are just that. Claims
» only. Not reality. The article says “inexhaustible supply”. If so, that
» implies a full head of hair. Show it to me. I say BS on the claims.
»
» You may be right that it may be a long, long time to achieve a full head
» of hair. I have never disagreed with that.

The beard hair thing may be more viable and more realistic than Intercytex and Follica. At least we know there are doctors who are doing beard hair transplant already, so it would not be too far fetched to ask some of the doctors to experiment.


#22

WTF Are you talking about? Why to clone beard hair when the same can be done with normal hair?

I tell you the reason why there is not a single gho patient.

  1. Gho may have a good science, but he didnot show really wow artistic skills in terms of his results.

  2. It will cost you a fortune. literaly. He charges 3900 euros ($6030) for 600 grafts. This explains the lack of wow results. The guys who can afford it are celebs who do not want anyone to know.

I think the price is high for two reasons. First the area in europe he does it is expensive one and many of his patients are from norway (the most expensive country on this planet). Second, he can’t do much more than 600 a day as lack of precision would surely compromise the regrowth ratio.


#23

» Please show me some examples of 2-for-1 transplants. How old are they,
» Amilcar?

To my knowledge they didt take it to the market , not at large scale for the least, but many scientists worked in that direction …


#24

The before/after photos are very unimpressive.

http://www.nyhairloss.com/procedures.htm

Dr. Gho was the first to attempt the 2 for 1 strategy using plucked hairs. He used scalp hair though and was unsuccessful. He cited the lack of results due to needing a certain amount of stromal tissue surrounding the plucked hair. Apparently plucked beard hair retains enough of the surrounding tissue to allow it to grow when implanted into the skin. I’m pretty sure this technique will have problems with consistency though.

We discussed this topic to death about 5 years ago and gave up on Hitzig when several patients came forward questioning his ethics.


#25

» Believe me, I wasn’t a big fan of Dr. Umar’s beard hair transplant, that
» was until I read this cloning article.
»
» The scarring is actually not an issue at all.

I’m pretty certain you guys are confused about Hitzig’s technique (okay, I’m probably confused about that, I’m skimming :)). He doesn’t extract the beard hair leaving a scar. He plucks the beard hair with tweezers and implants the plucked hair in the scalp. His claim is that 80% of the implanted hairs grow in the scalp, and 100% of the hairs that were plucked from the beard grow back. Gho tried this with scalp hair, and it didn’t work. The plucked scalp hairs have plenty of stem cells to make it work (see Dr. Gho’s study in the BJD), the problem is the hairs must have some surrounding tissue to interact with the stem cells on the plucked hair to make it work. Apparently beard hair has some of this tissue surrounding the bulb when the hair is plucked with tweezers.

Here is how to do the procedure:

  1. pluck the most robust beard hair, and immediately soak the graft in a keratinocyte based culture medium.

  2. Transplant the plucked hair into the scalp skin using a very small needle to make the hole.

  3. Wait and observe. You will find that some of the implanted beard hairs will grow, and others will not grow.

Why does it work?

The hair does not actually grow. It works because the hair has follicle stem cells, ORS cells, and other important signaling cells clinging to the large white bulb (you have to use a robust bulb in anagen). The combination of cells actually cause a new follicle (in some cases multiple follicles) to form in the skin. The new follicle supports hair that is reminiscent of the beard hair it came from but has some scalp hair characteristics (less kinky and grows longer). This technique results in unlimited donor hair and is very noninvasive. The main drawback is that you end up with beard hair in your head (okay if your a fan of BHT), and the plucked hair does not always result in a new follicle, so you have to have numerous procedures to achieve good density.

This is a neogenesis technique and is actually quite similar to what Aderans is currently experimenting with using scalp hair.


#26

» The before/after photos are very unimpressive.
»
» http://www.nyhairloss.com/procedures.htm
»
» Dr. Gho was the first to attempt the 2 for 1 strategy using plucked hairs.
» He used scalp hair though and was unsuccessful. He cited the lack of
» results due to needing a certain amount of stromal tissue surrounding the
» plucked hair. Apparently plucked beard hair retains enough of the
» surrounding tissue to allow it to grow when implanted into the skin. I’m
» pretty sure this technique will have problems with consistency though.
»
» We discussed this topic to death about 5 years ago and gave up on Hitzig
» when several patients came forward questioning his ethics.

There is a big difference, beard hair is thicker and more robust than regular scalp hair so maybe the stem cells pool from beard hair is more fertile, I think the success rate is going to be higher with beard hair.


#27

» There is a big difference, beard hair is thicker and more robust than
» regular scalp hair so maybe the stem cells pool from beard hair is more
» fertile, I think the success rate is going to be higher with beard hair.

I believe what matters most is that other cell types are on the plucked beard hair that are not present on the plucked scalp hair. Stem cells don’t grow new follicles. They work in concert with numerous other cells to grow new follicles. The most important thing in any HM protocol is “signaling environment.” It is important to think in terms of cell combinations as opposed to just thinking in terms of finding a super single cell type that turns out to be the magic bullet of HM.

The capstone cell of HM is a stem cell, but it is one of many cells that must be present in order to create a signaling environment capable of consistently growing cosmetically acceptable hair. Most likely, the reason why beard hair works better than scalp hair is because other cells are attached to the plucked beard hair that signal the stem cells allowing them to make a new follicle.

There are problems with Hitzig’s beard hair technique that prevent it from being offered for sale. However, culturing plucked beard hairs and implanting the cells into the scalp ala Gho could prove to be extremely interesting. It could even turn out to be the solution to inconsistency long searched for by Gho.


#28

I am lost heer.
It seems Dr Hitzig has cured baldness. Hasn’t he?

You can harvest the beard hairs as many times as needed and at the end you can have in your head as many hair as needed.

What is the problem? Where are the happy patients? Why is not everybody talking about this procedure?

Thanks.


#29

the big question nobody has asked is

can the beard hair halves that remain in place in the beard, regenerate a full hair.

if they can, can these full hairs that remain in place…be spliced again after a certain period of time

if so this could be very productive long term


#30

A plucked scalp hair dipped in Acell jell (or liquid) and implanted has a very good chance to grow if the plucked hair has stem cells clinging to the root.

There would be a unlimited donor supply.

Also the plucked hairs are smaller than a FUE graft so they can be placed closer together for more density.

We need a tool that can pluck a scalp hair with as much root and stem cells attached.

Acell hopes to have there plant for human use opened up this year.


#31

A plucked hair dipped in Acell and implanted deep enough to get a blood supply could be the answer.


#32

Dip a human hair in Acell, and grow a new human. :stuck_out_tongue:


#33

» » There is a big difference, beard hair is thicker and more robust than
» » regular scalp hair so maybe the stem cells pool from beard hair is more
» » fertile, I think the success rate is going to be higher with beard
» hair.
»
» I believe what matters most is that other cell types are on the plucked
» beard hair that are not present on the plucked scalp hair. Stem cells don’t
» grow new follicles. They work in concert with numerous other cells to grow
» new follicles. The most important thing in any HM protocol is “signaling
» environment.” It is important to think in terms of cell combinations as
» opposed to just thinking in terms of finding a super single cell type that
» turns out to be the magic bullet of HM.
»
» The capstone cell of HM is a stem cell, but it is one of many cells that
» must be present in order to create a signaling environment capable of
» consistently growing cosmetically acceptable hair. Most likely, the reason
» why beard hair works better than scalp hair is because other cells are
» attached to the plucked beard hair that signal the stem cells allowing them
» to make a new follicle.
»
» There are problems with Hitzig’s beard hair technique that prevent it from
» being offered for sale. However, culturing plucked beard hairs and
» implanting the cells into the scalp ala Gho could prove to be extremely
» interesting. It could even turn out to be the solution to inconsistency
» long searched for by Gho.

http://www.nyhairloss.com/procedures.htm

That page does not inspire much confidence. I will concur that plucked beard hairs regrow. I had some folliculitus in my shaving area in my early twenties and sometimes would pluck several of the large beard hair follicles up there in the infected affected area to relieve some of the tension, and there would be a bare area for a while on my chin, that would completely be filled in with beard follicles about six months later. Ive plucked the left side of my chin in small areas repeatedly and the beard hairs always came back. My derm finally gave me a medication to put up there that cleared it up. The internal anti-biotics she tried at first were not very helpful.

If Hitzig’s idea worked, hell any guy could try it. He could make a vertical slit on his hairline, carefully tweeze out a beard hair, put it in the slit, and close it, maybe put a band aid atop it for a couple of days. It would shed in a week or two, and then grow back in a few months…

The problem is, Ive never seen ANY MAN come on these forums and say “hey look at my beard hair transplant from Dr. Hitzig” and how “I completely restored my bald spot with beard hair that looks astonishgly much more like head hair, etc.”. Ive seen nothing and heard nothing.
BUT WHAT I HAVE HEARD are a couple of different men complaining about how they were dealt with via Hitzig. I remember reading about one guy who went to a consultation with Hitzig and came away thinking “slippery salesman” afterwards who opted to go with someone else.

Also, if this did indeed work, Dr. Umar in California, Dr. Cole in Georgia, Dr. Arvind Poswal in India, and Dr. Woods in Australia would have certainly have been using it by now. If a guy was willing to keep a buzz cut all his life, theoreticall speaking you could make a headfull of hair with beard hair that would actually “LIKE” testosterone. It would be wavy if grown out very long though…thus would have to be kept short to be cosmetically pleasing…


#34

» the big question nobody has asked is
»
» can the beard hair halves that remain in place in the beard, regenerate a
» full hair.
»
» if they can, can these full hairs that remain in place…be
» spliced again after a certain period of time
»
» if so this could be very productive long term

Cut and pasted from Balding-Blog…rather insightful I think:

Auto-Cloning Technique for Facial Hair?
December 4 2007, 2:33 pm PT | Posted in: Hair Cloning + Hair Transplantation + Other Surgical Procedures

I have heard of a technique called auto-cloning performed by Dr. Gary Hitzig in New York, New York. He tweezes beard hair under the chin which leaves part of the root to regrow and part of the hairs root stays with the tweezed hair to grow in the transplanted area. I would be very interested in having this procedure performed to thicken my mustache both because of my limited donor hair and for having the thickness and texture of beard hair. Facial hair and body hair transplants are becoming increasingly common why is this technique not more popular as it solves many problems for people who have limited donor hair? Is there a problem with this technique?

My medical group had tried to repeat the work after we heard about it from the doctor who said that he invented the technique. We did it just as he said it was to be done, and as was expected, the results were essentially a complete failure to grow hair. As far as I am aware, nobody has proven this technique or published the method in a peer reviewed journal for confirmation, which says a great deal about credibility. If it worked, I am sure that the technique would be available everywhere, because it infers that you get two hairs for one (hair replication)… something that has not been done by any other.

I also look to the credibility of the ‘inventor’ and via Google, I turned up with the following links:

HairLossHelp.com - Forum Post “Worst Doctor”
HairBoutique.com - Doctors Sue In Attempt To Silence Truth For Consumers
Tags: auto-cloning, facial, hairloss, hair loss, gary hitzig, new york, hitzig, hairtransplant, hair transplant, replication, cloning, hair cloning

Ask a question | Related entries | Permanent link |


#35

"Don’t believe the hype surrounding Hitzig’s beard FM either. Here is an excerpt from a well known clinic.

“Dr. Gary Hitzig presented a patient that he had grafted with plucked beard hairs. He stated that the plucked hairs re-grow. I have seen one of his patients 6 months after surgery and nothing was growing. I had to remove the implanted hairs, which had not fallen out. They were beginning to form cysts around them since the non-growing hairs were acting like foreign bodies.”

I have also cringed at photo documentation from a few of his SEVERELY scarred/disfigured patients. He performs hairtransplants and hairlifts, and told a certain performer that he only performs hairlifts on models/actors, not traditional transplants, as the hairlifts have superior results, therefore he recieved a hairlift. (if this procedure is supposedly better than traditional transplants, why would he do transplants at all??) This poor fellow had HUGE gaping holes/gaps all over and major necrosis, while his posterior donor area was halfway up his neck! His career/livlihood and social life was ruined! Wish I could find the aforementioned pics. Would make your skin crawl.
Makes me sick… "

Me again…I think this answers the questions about his “beard hair cloning” . It was a lie, period


#36

» "Don’t believe the hype surrounding Hitzig’s beard FM either. Here is an
» excerpt from a well known clinic.
»
» “Dr. Gary Hitzig presented a patient that he had grafted with plucked
» beard hairs. He stated that the plucked hairs re-grow. I have seen one of
» his patients 6 months after surgery and nothing was growing. I had to
» remove the implanted hairs, which had not fallen out. They were beginning
» to form cysts around them since the non-growing hairs were acting like
» foreign bodies.”
»
» I have also cringed at photo documentation from a few of his SEVERELY
» scarred/disfigured patients. He performs hairtransplants and hairlifts, and
» told a certain performer that he only performs hairlifts on models/actors,
» not traditional transplants, as the hairlifts have superior results,
» therefore he recieved a hairlift. (if this procedure is supposedly better
» than traditional transplants, why would he do transplants at all??) This
» poor fellow had HUGE gaping holes/gaps all over and major necrosis, while
» his posterior donor area was halfway up his neck! His career/livlihood and
» social life was ruined! Wish I could find the aforementioned pics. Would
» make your skin crawl.
» Makes me sick… "
»
»
»

the whole situation now that you pointed this out, sounds like amway or Bosley
totally…errr on the fringes of what you would want to spend ur time on