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Hair multiplication using beard hair, doctors already doing it


#1

This was old, just reposted by hairsite in the hair transplant forum. This is hair multiplication, literally! No wonder everybody in the hair transplant forum is talking about using beard hair lately, i think it has real potential for hair multiplication, best of all, no FDA approval needed and doctors are already doing it.

"Auto-Cloning" of Beard Hair Used to Increase Supply of Donor Hair for Transplantation to Scalp

NEW YORK (October 16, 2003)- Beard whiskers, carefully removed, may offer an inexhaustible supply of hair for transplantation to the scalp. With proper removal technique, the continued growth of beard hair at the removal site is not compromised.

This “auto-cloning” of beard hairs may be particularly effective for balding men who have little scalp hair left for transplantation, and for persons whose scalps have been scarred by injury or burns, according to Gary Hitzig, MD, New York.

Dr. Hitzig, a physician hair restoration specialist in private practice, reported on the successful “auto-cloning” of beard hair today at the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Hair Transplantation Surgery (ISHRS). The ISHRS is meeting October 15-19 at the Marriott Marquis Hotel, New York City.

The transplantation of beard whiskers to the scalp without compromising continued growth of the beard was undertaken by Dr. Hitzig following research reported by Dr. J.C.Kim, Pook University, Korea. Dr. Kim reported research showing that each human hair can theoretically be split into two, and produce two hairs from one. This requires enough “stem” cells be present in each portion to regenerate the full follicle.

Dr. Hitzig designed a study, enlisting five men, that was based on Dr. Kim’s work. Using a specially designed “tweezing” tool, Dr. Hitzig removed beard hairs from the men by extracting enough of the follicle to produce a new one when implanted, but also leaving enough of the follicle to continue growing new beard hairs at the donor site. This suggested that beard hair would not only not be depleted, but could serve as a non-depleting source of hair for future transplantation. In men who experience hair loss over most of the scalp, so much hair may be lost that little or none is left for transplantation. The lack of donor scalp hair may limit the benefits that these men could realize from transplantation. A non-depleting supply of donor hair could a substantial benefit for these men.

Dr. Hitzig chose coarse hair from the chin or sideburns for transplantation in the reported study; the coarse hair demonstrated greater vitality than finer hair after it was transplanted to the scalp. Earlier studies had shown that less coarse hair had less vitality after transplantation; patients also experienced less discomfort from plucking of hair from the chin or sideburns.

The five men in the study shared the characteristics of age (40-57 years old), having had previous hair transplants, and lack of adequate donor scalp hair for future transplants as balding progressed.

Results of the study demonstrated the potential of bear hair transplantation to the scalp, Dr. Hitzig reported. With the use of coarser chin and sideburn hair, the “take” of beard hairs transplanted to the scalp was more than 80%. Post-transplant hair counts at six months showed increased density of approximately 25 hairs per 30 hairs transplanted. Examination of beards in the five men showed no change in pre-plucked density, suggesting that the follicles left intact had continued to produce new hairs.

The transplanted beard hairs retained their coarse “chin whisker” characteristics after transplantation into the scalp. The thickness of the transplanted beard hairs provided good coverage of the scalp at the transplant site, Dr. Hitzig said.

Expanding upon successful beard hair transplantation in the five men studied, Dr. Hitzig has completed a preliminary study in which several beard hairs were transplanted into scars created by previous harvesting of donor scalp hair. Results of this preliminary study have been encouraging enough to indicate the potential of beard hair transplantation into scarred scalp, Dr. Hitzig said.

Although “auto-cloning” was used to describe Dr. Hitzig’s procedure, no actual cloning was involved. Dr. Hitzig’s process is a transfer of hair and its genetic programming to a new site, where the hair continues to replicate the appearance it had at the donor site.

The “cloning” usually reported in hair restoration studies is in vitro (laboratory dish) replication of hair follicle cells-a technique that is more correctly called tissue engineering. Varying degrees of success have been reported in studies of in vitro replication. True cloning-transfer of genetic material into a cell to replicate a “mother” cell-has not been reported for purposes of hair restoration.

The ISHRS is the world’s largest not-for-profit professional organization in the field of hair restoration surgery, with 512 physician members in 45 countries. The organization was founded in 1992 to promote the advancement of the specialty of hair restoration surgery through education, information-sharing, and observance of ethical standards.

[Hitzig GS. Auto-cloning using beard hair. Cosmetic Dermatology 2003; 16:63-69.]


#2

Here we have doctors successfully cloning hairs…yes they are beard hairs but they are cloned into two hairs…split into two hairs, whatever the terminology that is appropriate, but the end result is two growing hairs from one previous hair

and you guys, so eager to latch onto any tidbit of news of ICX And Follica…both of whom are years away from bringing their technology to market…ignore this remarkable achievement

This tells me that some of you are either blind to using different approaches. or you are not as sincere in your hope for HM as it might appear at first glance.’

either that or you guys have no beard hair …which i would find far fetched

or perhaps, it is because you do not like the fact that this would have to be combined with a hair transplant…However I think this being a proven working technology has a lot more potential than anything ICX or follica has out there at the current thime.


#3

It’s an interesting article. But it is very old. If this were really a great solution, where is one person who has restored his hair using this method? That’s why it has no appeal to me. There’s no way I’d even consider transplanting beard hair, unless I could see for myself that it looked natural and truly provided unlimited donor hair.

I would also need to see the scarring that took place in the donor area. The last thing I need is scars on my face. I would prefer to take donor hair from an area that is more easily concealable, not from my face. Another reason this article has no interest for me.

Something like ICX holds more appeal, because they (in theory) only have to take donor area one time (not from the face), and the multiplication is done in a lab. Of course there isn’t any reason to believe this works either (other than in theory). But I have much more interest in an ICX type solution than beard hair transplants. I read the words “beard hair transplant” and I just say, “Next!”.


#4

» It’s an interesting article. But it is very old. If this were really a
» great solution, where is one person who has restored his hair using this
» method? That’s why it has no appeal to me. There’s no way I’d even
» consider transplanting beard hair, unless I could see for myself that it
» looked natural and truly provided unlimited donor hair.
»
» I would also need to see the scarring that took place in the donor area.
» The last thing I need is scars on my face. I would prefer to take donor
» hair from an area that is more easily concealable, not from my face.
» Another reason this article has no interest for me.
»
» Something like ICX holds more appeal, because they (in theory) only have
» to take donor area one time (not from the face), and the multiplication is
» done in a lab. Of course there isn’t any reason to believe this works
» either (other than in theory). But I have much more interest in an ICX
» type solution than beard hair transplants. I read the words “beard hair
» transplant” and I just say, “Next!”.

i will dig up the beard scar after pics of Umars most recent patient,


#5

Exactly, Arvind and Umar are doing a lot of beard hair transplants already, perhaps we are onto something, imagine the possiblity if they can keep splitting beard hairs.


#6

» Exactly, Arvind and Umar are doing a lot of beard hair transplants already,
» perhaps we are onto something, imagine the possiblity if they can keep
» splitting beard hairs.

if splitting beard hairs works…and body hairs can be successfully transplanted into scalps, why would not scalp hair splitting work?


#7

» » Exactly, Arvind and Umar are doing a lot of beard hair transplants
» already,
» » perhaps we are onto something, imagine the possiblity if they can keep
» » splitting beard hairs.
»
» if splitting beard hairs works…and body hairs can be
» successfully transplanted into scalps, why would not scalp hair splitting
» work?

IIRC it has been/being tried already.


#8

Gho and others claim they can do this already, and their work has been published. However, there is absolutely no physical proof that it works. Only claims. Just as with the beard transplant, where is even one person that has restored their hair with this technique.

For me, a procedure must be able to provide at least 25K-30K new hairs that will be permanent, to replace my lost hair, as well as for future thinning. That’s the minimum. I don’t know how many beard hairs you can get from one procedure, but even if it’s 1000, that would mean 25-30 extractions from the same donor area. I just can’t imagine that there wouldn’t be any scarring on your face after that many procedures.

The same would go for using normal hairs too. But you would at least have more hairs in the donor area to extract, and it would easier to hide any scarring from the multiple extractions from the same donor area. But again, there is no proof that this actually works.

This is the main reason why I would prefer an ICX type solution. One time extraction of a few hundred hairs at most, and in essence an unlimited supply. And just like everything else out there, there’s no proof that this works either. :frowning:


#9

» Gho and others claim they can do this already, and their work has been
» published. However, there is absolutely no physical proof that it works.
» Only claims. Just as with the beard transplant, where is even one person
» that has restored their hair with this technique.
»
» For me, a procedure must be able to provide at least 25K-30K new hairs
» that will be permanent, to replace my lost hair, as well as for future
» thinning. That’s the minimum. I don’t know how many beard hairs you can
» get from one procedure, but even if it’s 1000, that would mean 25-30
» extractions from the same donor area. I just can’t imagine that there
» wouldn’t be any scarring on your face after that many procedures.
»
» The same would go for using normal hairs too. But you would at least have
» more hairs in the donor area to extract, and it would easier to hide any
» scarring from the multiple extractions from the same donor area. But
» again, there is no proof that this actually works.
»
» This is the main reason why I would prefer an ICX type solution. One time
» extraction of a few hundred hairs at most, and in essence an unlimited
» supply. And just like everything else out there, there’s no proof that
» this works either. :frowning:

This may surprise you but Dr. Umar says he can extract 10,000 or more beard hairs from the patient,
read this from a few days ago,
http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/forum_entry-id-28160-page-0-category-2-order-last_answer.html


#10

This issue is like FUE work.

People argue all day about the limit of extractible FUE grafts as if it’s a hard scientific thing. But the real limit is a judgement call about what is an “acceptable” amount of thinning in the donor area.

Probably same limit with beard hairs, I would guess.

Science might be able to get X-number of hairs from the beard in theory. But in practice, I suspect the scarring will probably limit the extent of the work that can be done in the area long before that.


#11

Those are crap after pictures. No way I would pay somebody to look like that. Again, if he can show me somebody who has a full, natural head of hair (not an illusion of full-like, but actually a full head of hair) using beard hair that supposedly can be harvested again, I’ll reconsider.


#12

Getting 2 new follicles from one is old technique …so old ! Its everything but our Messiah…and to be franc this has nothing to do with the HM board ! to talk about HM you need to have significant scale of multiplication not 2 out of 1 !!!


#13

» This issue is like FUE work.
»
» People argue all day about the limit of extractible FUE grafts as if it’s
» a hard scientific thing. But the real limit is a judgement call about what
» is an “acceptable” amount of thinning in the donor area.
»
» Probably same limit with beard hairs, I would guess.
»
» Science might be able to get X-number of hairs from the beard in theory.
» But in practice, I suspect the scarring will probably limit the extent of
» the work that can be done in the area long before that.

Believe me, I wasn’t a big fan of Dr. Umar’s beard hair transplant, that was until I read this cloning article.

The scarring is actually not an issue at all.


#14

No transplant is EVER EVER EVER going to give you or anyone else a “full” head of “natural” hair as you call it. Most realistic, logical people who undergo transplants are not under the impression that they are magically going to turn into Brad Pitt after the procedure. There is NO SUCH THING as a “natural, full head of hair” following a transplant. Depending on hair color, the head has approximately 120,000 hair follicles. That is a pretty thick beard, aint it? Transplants CAN give decent coverage as is evidenced by some of the patients on the Transplant Forum from doctors like Armani and Hasson & Wong, to name a few.


#15

» No transplant is EVER EVER EVER going to give you or anyone else a “full”
» head of “natural” hair as you call it. Most realistic, logical people who
» undergo transplants are not under the impression that they are magically
» going to turn into Brad Pitt after the procedure. There is NO SUCH THING as
» a “natural, full head of hair” following a transplant. Depending on hair
» color, the head has approximately 120,000 hair follicles. That is a pretty
» thick beard, aint it?

Yeah, who doesn’t want our virgin head hair back but there is nothing right now that is remotely promising in giving us an unlimited supply of hair. If beard hair turns out to be a source for unlimited donor supply, this is a huge step forward. The HM guys should spend some time in the hair transplant forum, many doctors are doing beard hair transplant like clockwork already on their patients, we just need to convince some doctors to experiment with another donor extraction method to see if the beard grows back.


#16

» Getting 2 new follicles from one is old technique …so old ! Its
» everything but our Messiah…and to be franc this has nothing to do with the
» HM board ! to talk about HM you need to have significant scale of
» multiplication not 2 out of 1 !!!

at least 2 out of 1 works

significant multiplication is just a fantasy at this point


#17

Please show me some examples of 2-for-1 transplants. How old are they, Amilcar?


#18

Ummmmm, the guy is claiming that they can harvest and reharvest beard hair. I wasn’t talking about a normal tranplant. I was talking about somebody claiming to transplant supposedly 10,000 beard hairs, and then reharvest again. My point was that these are only claims, not reality. There is no proof of this. Show me a full head of hair, which should be possible with these claims. I agree that you cannot currently get a full, natural looking head of hair given current technology. That was my point.


#19

» Ummmmm, the guy is claiming that they can harvest and reharvest beard hair.
» I wasn’t talking about a normal tranplant. I was talking about somebody
» claiming to transplant supposedly 10,000 beard hairs, and then reharvest
» again. My point was that these are only claims, not reality. There is no
» proof of this. Show me a full head of hair, which should be possible with
» these claims. I agree that you cannot currently get a full, natural
» looking head of hair given current technology. That was my point.

and where is the alternative? HM is a joke, and may never ever come to fruition, in any shape or form

you guys act like transplants are inferior to the almighty HM which will get a full head of hair, while transplants are only an illusion of a full head of hair

meanwhile the guys with a decent transplant, although the risks have to be considered, are at least getting an improvement, and the 2 for 1 splitting of the beard hairs has been proven

you act like…show me a full head of hair that has been achieved with this…as if to say, its crap since it cannot achieve this

if that is the standard you judge by, good luck finding anything in your lifetime that can meet your expectations. you will have a very long wait


#20

What I said was that the claims are not valid. They are just that. Claims only. Not reality. The article says “inexhaustible supply”. If so, that implies a full head of hair. Show it to me. I say BS on the claims.

You may be right that it may be a long, long time to achieve a full head of hair. I have never disagreed with that.