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Gray hair and MPB


#1

First forgive me if this was discussed before, but I am just putting something up here guided by my gut/intuition, not knowledge. I have little knowledge about the science behind MPB. Therefore this thread might be and probably is nonsense, however I have no reputation that I could loose, so I decided to put it up here, anyway.
I might be wrong, but I have this vague gut feeling that once a man starts to get gray hair, his MPB slows down or stops. When hairs turn gray, it is like they get thicker and don’t shed as much as the pigmented do. That was case with both my grandparents. This impression of mine might be completely false and I might be completely wrong, but I wonder, has anyone else noticed the same thing. I know that each hair follicle contains a certain number of pigment cells which continuously produce a chemical called melanin and as we get older, those pigment cells in our hair follicles gradually die and …as people continue to get older, fewer pigment cells will be around to produce melanin. Eventually, the hair will look completely gray. I know that the melanin is also genetically predetermined and someone gets the gray hair sooner and some later.And, as much as I know, not all hair follicles on our head are susceptible to DHT. And, we don’t know why is that. Is it possible that those originally susceptible to DHT, are not any longer, after they had lost the pigment cells?:lookaround:


#2

» First forgive me if this was discussed before, but I am just putting
» something up here guided by my gut/intuition, not knowledge. I have little
» knowledge about the science behind MPB. Therefore this thread might be and
» probably is nonsense, however I have no reputation that I could loose, so
» I decided to put it up here, anyway.
» I might be wrong, but I have this vague gut feeling that once a man
» starts to get gray hair, his MPB slows down or stops
. When hairs turn
» gray, it is like they get thicker and don’t shed as much as the pigmented
» do. That was case with both my grandparents. This impression of mine might
» be completely false and I might be completely wrong, but I wonder, has
» anyone else noticed the same thing. I know that each hair follicle contains
» a certain number of pigment cells which continuously produce a chemical
» called melanin and as we get older, those pigment cells in our hair
» follicles gradually die and …as people continue to get older, fewer
» pigment cells will be around to produce melanin. Eventually, the hair will
» look completely gray. I know that the melanin is also genetically
» predetermined and someone gets the gray hair sooner and some later.And, as
» much as I know, not all hair follicles on our head are susceptible to DHT.
» And, we don’t know why is that. Is it possible that those originally
» susceptible to DHT, are not any longer, after they had lost the pigment
» cells?:lookaround:

Its more likely that by the time you go grey, you’re old enough that your DHT levels have dropped off, thus slowing down the progression of loss.


#3

I don’t think there is a connection between the two.

QUOTE:

Scientists have recently discovered that there are four enzymes working together to cause hair to turn gray.

New discovery about the cause of gray hair was reported by the scientists and researchers at the the Universities of Bradford, Mainz and Luebeck. Details about their findings will be published in the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology’s journal.

It was discovered that the primary or leading cause of gray hair starts with a reduction in the enzyme called catalase. Lack of catalase can result in an accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen peroxide can in turn inhibits the production of the enzyme tyrosinase. Tyrosinase produces melanin, the hair’s natural pigment.

Catalase enzymes in the body are known for their efficiency. They can break down millions of hydrogen peroxide molecules per second.

Excess hydrogen peroxide levels in the body do not only lead to graying hair. Hydrogen peroxide can also cause cell damage.

There is also a reduction of repair enzymes A and B preventing hair follicles from repairing the damage caused by the build up of hydrogen peroxide.

Research is underway to find out more about the mechanisms that lead to gray hair and possible treatment, according to one of the researchers, Karin Schallreuter, a professor of clinical and experimental dermatology at England’s University of Bradford.

For those who can’t wait for scientists to come up with a new product that target the lack of catalase, you may want to consider supplements that can boost catalase in our body. However, there is presently no research that suggest catalase boosting supplements can indeed reverse gray hair. Catalase is one of 4 naturally produced free-radical fighters that protect against cell damage. Catalase, along with the other 3 - superoxide dimutase, methionine reductase, and glutothione peroxidase- are all available in supplement form.

Also read article on restoring hair color using K(D)PT, a peptide that is related to Melanin Stimulating Hormone MSH.


#4

I am not sure there is a connection, but it is interesting. I know two guys that I see all the time around my gym, both older then me and have been grey ever since I knew them. They have also both been thin in the crown since I have known them but their hairlines are good. I have known them each for about 10 years and neither one’s hairloss has progressed over that time.

Your point made me think of these two guys.


#5

» I am not sure there is a connection, but it is interesting. I know two guys
» that I see all the time around my gym, both older then me and have been
» grey ever since I knew them. They have also both been thin in the crown
» since I have known them but their hairlines are good. I have known them
» each for about 10 years and neither one’s hairloss has progressed over that
» time.
»
» Your point made me think of these two guys.

I don’t know,but out of curiosity I tried to find one .Again,it is probably nonsense,but I will put it here nevertheless.For laughs.

You see,the gray hair is completely white (no pigment whatsoever) so therefore wards off harmful UV rays from sunlight.Sunlight impact on our hair is on the top of our heads,on those hairs which are susceptible to DHT,as opposed the ones on the sides that are not susceptible to DHT.Maybe they are susceptible to DHT because of the impact of harmful UV rays?And the gray and pigmented hairs,on parts other than top of head, are imune from DHT because there is no impact (or less impact) of harmful UV rays ? :lookaround:

Another thing,gray hair,if you noticed,has different texture than pigmented,which is the result of reduced moisture that accompanies reduced pigment.


#6

MPB is a gift from our ancestors,for sure.It is in the genes of good percentage of males.But,not all males.Some males.Therefore, a mutation ,an alteration of a certain gene’s DNA sequence started occurring at some point in our evolution from hairy apes to modern humans.

Now…

The DNA in any cell can be altered through environmental exposure to ultraviolet radiation, …That is a fact.Go check your selves.

Now…

when DHT attach itself to the hair follicle it causes it to shrink … eventually keeping it from producing more hair.
The follicles susceptible to DHT (and therefore MPB)on top of our heads must(?) have greater number of androgen receptors for the DHT to attach to.Maybe because for thousands of years during evolution UV rays raided those little soldiers ,until that UV exposure finally induced mutation, in the DNA of the cells,developing characteristic different than their buddies on the sides of our head?:lookaround:

Now…

What if,gray hair doesn’t have androgen receptors any longer,(or has much less)after it turned gray?Because it lost the pigmented cells.

The question is does Melanin Pigmentation in human Skin (and hair) has anything to do with Hormonal Regulation?

If it does,did little Johny find your Holy grail?:smiley:


#7

I started this same thread in hair loss research forum.I don’t want to double post if that violates your rules.I hope it is ok to move my thread to more appropriate place,which I think is that forum.


#8

» I started this same thread in hair loss research forum.I don’t want to
» double post if that violates your rules.I hope it is ok to move my thread
» to more appropriate place,which I think is that forum.

You got it. Thank you.