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Folica and existing follicles


#1

I think existing follicles extend something like 3-4 mm down into the skin. Dermabrasion probably couldn’t safely wipe out any more than about 1mm of skin.

Once and for all – Do we have any indication of how the Folica method affects the existing follicles?

I see so many possibilities:

– Wipe out existing follicles? Create new ones on their sites?

– Create new ones between the existing ones? (Doesn’t that have to mean we’d end up with MORE than original density?)

– Heal the existing follicles along with new ones? ONLY heal the existing follicles and not create any fully-formed new ones?

I don’t know about the rest of you, but I just can’t mentally put this issue aside as a minor technicality to be hashed out later on. Finding a method of creating 50 all-new hairs per cm2 doesn’t sound quite so grand anymore if it demands permanently wiping out 150 existing hairs/cm2 on the site.


#2

Cal.

Follica do not play at all with existing follicles…neither existing the hair follicles nor the existing hair stem cells …Through the Follica approach the “epidermis”(non concerned with hair cycling before) cells start to act like hair stem cells and generate new hair follicles that dont belong to the pre-treatment hair cells lines.

My source : the de novo hair Nature letter of Cotsarelis and his team.

Here is a quotation from the abstract adressing the issue :

“Here we show that, after wounding, hair follicles form de novo in genetically normal adult mice. The regenerated hair follicles establish a stem cell population, express known molecular markers of follicle differentiation, produce a hair shaft and progress through all stages of the hair follicle cycle. Lineage analysis demonstrated that the nascent follicles arise from epithelial cells outside of the hair follicle stem cell niche, suggesting that epidermal cells in the wound assume a hair follicle stem cell phenotype.”


#3

That makes perfect sense to me in theory, but wouldn’t that cause problems in reality?

If your existing follicles still function on an area you dermabraded and treated, then you would end up with TOO MANY follicles at the site. That doesn’t make sense to me. I would expect the human body to have some type of genetic guide for approximately how many hairs a certain area of scalp skin can support.

If you performed the Folica procedure on an area where the original follicles are still working, then what happens? Forming any new follicles (without losing the old follicles) would cause a situation of many more follicles (in total) than the skin was orignally supposed to have there. The only way to avoid this situaiton would be if Folica’s method either does not create any new follicles until the old ones are totally dead, or else if the method kills the old follicles in the process.

I do not see any other possibility if Folica is creating 100% all-new follicles and not repairing old ones.


#4

» That makes perfect sense to me in theory, but wouldn’t that cause problems
» in reality?
»
» If your existing follicles still function on an area you dermabraded and
» treated, then you would end up with TOO MANY follicles at the site. That
» doesn’t make sense to me. I would expect the human body to have some type
» of genetic guide for approximately how many hairs a certain area of scalp
» skin can support.
»
» If you performed the Folica procedure on an area where the original
» follicles are still working, then what happens? Forming any new follicles
» (without losing the old follicles) would cause a situation of many more
» follicles (in total) than the skin was orignally supposed to have there.
» The only way to avoid this situaiton would be if Folica’s method either
» does not create any new follicles until the old ones are totally dead, or
» else if the method kills the old follicles in the process.
»
» I do not see any other possibility if Folica is creating 100% all-new
» follicles and not repairing old ones.

Good point cal, I have also wondered whether there might be some kind of upper limit on how many follicles you can get in one given area, and especially by using Follica’s method. It will be interesting to see the results from the human trials. I just hope the method will work with great results on people with MPB…


#5

» I think existing follicles extend something like 3-4 mm down into the skin.
» Dermabrasion probably couldn’t safely wipe out any more than about 1mm of
» skin.
»
» Once and for all – Do we have any indication of how
» the Folica method affects the existing follicles?

»
» I see so many possibilities:
»
» – Wipe out existing follicles? Create new ones on their sites?
»
» – Create new ones between the existing ones? (Doesn’t that have to mean
» we’d end up with MORE than original density?)
»
» – Heal the existing follicles along with new ones? ONLY heal the
» existing follicles and not create any fully-formed new ones?

The way I see it is that your body refers back to your original ‘blueprint’ so it checks ALL follicles. If some of these existing ones are beginning to miniaturise but are still producing hair, they’ll get a boost in the form of rejuvenation to ‘commission’ them back to their original spec. That’s the way I see it anyway. No, I’m not a doctor. I’m an engineer.
»
»
»
»
» I don’t know about the rest of you, but I just can’t mentally put this
» issue aside as a minor technicality to be hashed out later on. Finding a
» method of creating 50 all-new hairs per cm2 doesn’t sound quite so grand
» anymore if it demands permanently wiping out 150 existing hairs/cm2 on the
» site.


#6

my apologies if it’s already been posted here ;

Nature (17 May 2007)

“Wnt-dependent de novo hair follicle regeneration in adult mouse skin after wounding”

full paper > http://www.m e g a u p l o a d.com/?d=BTHF91UE