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Dr. Mizuguchi


#1

I believe Dr. Mizuguchi has it right about sending follices to a company, they clone them, and then send them back. I did a search for some cloning companies out there – and there are many. They identify cloning pets, children etc, etc. So, why could I not go to a transplant surgeon, have him/her remove via FUE several follicles. Ship them to one of these companies. My guess is if they can clone a sheep and offer to clone pets, then I’m thinking cloning a hair follicle would be no more difficult. Once they have cloned it 1000 times, they send it back to the surgeon who could then insert the cloned hair. Am I missing something? I emailed one of the companies asking if it was a viable option to send them hair follicles to be cloned and am awaiting a response.


#2

» I believe Dr. Mizuguchi has it right about sending follices to a company,
» they clone them, and then send them back. I did a search for some cloning
» companies out there – and there are many. They identify cloning pets,
» children etc, etc. So, why could I not go to a transplant surgeon, have
» him/her remove via FUE several follicles. Ship them to one of these
» companies. My guess is if they can clone a sheep and offer to clone pets,
» then I’m thinking cloning a hair follicle would be no more difficult. Once
» they have cloned it 1000 times, they send it back to the surgeon who could
» then insert the cloned hair. Am I missing something? I emailed one of the
» companies asking if it was a viable option to send them hair follicles to
» be cloned and am awaiting a response.

Well of course cloning would be done by external companies as otherwise every transplant surgeon would have to be equipped with their own bio-engineering lab for cell cloning, with specialized personnel etc. Outsourcing this procedure is not very surprising at all.

However, comparing cloning animals and entire organisms to cloning single organs is quite a different procedure. It would be easier today to clone the balding patient and harvest the clones resistant donor hair, implant it into the other patient and kill the clone. The problem about cloning single organs is that u need a scaffolding for the cells to grow upon, as they are not programmed to form in thin air. Furthermore, an appropriate environment is required such as cell signaling, growth hormones, etc. to develop into functional organs.

Cloning animals is as simple as fertilizing a female carrier with an embryonic cell who’s DNA has been substituted with the clone DNA. The development of the embryo can then take its natural course and develop into a fully functional organism…

Sadly, growing follicles ex-vivo in petri-dishes is NOT as easy as that.


#3

Let’s wait…


#4

» Well of course cloning would be done by external companies as otherwise
» every transplant surgeon would have to be equipped with their own
» bio-engineering lab for cell cloning, with specialized personnel etc.
» Outsourcing this procedure is not very surprising at all.
»
» However, comparing cloning animals and entire organisms to cloning single
» organs is quite a different procedure. It would be easier today to clone
» the balding patient and harvest the clones resistant donor hair, implant it
» into the other patient and kill the clone. The problem about cloning single
» organs is that u need a scaffolding for the cells to grow upon, as they are
» not programmed to form in thin air. Furthermore, an appropriate environment
» is required such as cell signaling, growth hormones, etc. to develop into
» functional organs.
»
» Cloning animals is as simple as fertilizing a female carrier with an
» embryonic cell who’s DNA has been substituted with the clone DNA. The
» development of the embryo can then take its natural course and develop into
» a fully functional organism…
»
» Sadly, growing follicles ex-vivo in petri-dishes is NOT as easy as that.

you’re completely right ! cloning hair is quite different from cloning pets, and unfortunately for us, isn’t easier