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Bimatoprost, the active ingredient in latisse, definitely grows scalp hair


#1

First try the link and if you can’t get the link open then below the link is the abstract.

http://www.hair2010.org/abstract/81.asp

A prostaglandin F2? analogue, bimatoprost, used for glaucoma stimulates scalp hair follicle growth in organ culture; is this a new approach for alopecia therapy?

Mr Karzan Khidhir, Centre for Skin Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK, United Kingdom
Dr Nilofer Farjo, Farjo Medical Centre, Manchester, UK, United Kingdom
Dr Bessam Farjo, Farjo Medical Centre, Manchester, UK, United Kingdom
Dr David Woodward, Allergan Inc, Irvine, Clifornia, United States
Dr Steven Picksley, Centre for Skin Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK, United Kingdom
Professor Valerie Randall, Centre for Skin Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK, United Kingdom

Prostaglandin F2? (PGF2?) analogues, e.g. bimatoprost, stimulate eyelash growth as a side-effect when used to treat ocular hypertension (glaucoma). This phenomenon resembles the unwanted hair promoted by an antihypertensive drug, minoxidil, now widely-used for balding. How bimatoprost acts is unknown; possibilities include direct action on eyelash follicles or stimulating follicular blood flow. To determine whether scalp hair follicles can respond directly to bimatoprost and to check whether the effect is through follicular receptors, human scalp follicles were cultured with bimatoprost or PGF2?; gene and protein expression for the PGF2? receptor (FP) were also investigated using molecular biological and immunohistological approaches.
Scalp skin from non-balding areas was obtained from healthy individuals undergoing elective cosmetic surgery with appropriate approval. Hair follicles were individually microdissected and cultured for 9 days with daily examination, photography and measurement or pooled for each person for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using primers for the human FP gene. Hair follicle cryosections were also incubated with antibodies to FP.
Both bimatoprost & PGF 2? at 10 nM, 100 nM & 1µM significantly stimulated the hair follicle growth rate, percentage of growing follicles, and overall amount of hair produced (n=5; P<0.05-0.01). RT-PCR identified FP gene expression in 5 individual’s follicles; sequencing confirmed gene identity. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated FP protein in dermal papillae and connective tissue sheaths of follicles from 5 different individuals. Therefore, isolated human scalp hair follicles respond biologically to PGF2? and bimatoprost in organ culture and express both the gene and protein for the receptor, FP. Thus, bimatoprost can act on receptors within human scalp hair follicles to stimulate growth. These results also suggest that PGF2? and prostamides may play a role in normal hair growth. Bimatoprost and related drugs appear to offer an exciting novel approach for the treatment of alopecia and their action merits further investigation.


#2

I have posted the abstract for you below the link. H. Uno is one of the top researchers in hair loss. It doesn’t get any better than Uno when it comes to hair loss research.

Source: PubMed

Acta Derm Venereol 2002;82(1):7-12

Uno H, Zimbric ML, Albert DM, Stjernschantz J.

Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Centre, School of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA. huno4@attbi.com

Latanoprost, a selective FP prostanoid receptor agonist used in the treatment of glaucoma, has a hypertrichotic side effect. Using the macaque model of androgenetic alopecia, we examined the effect of latanoprost on hair growth. Eight monkeys were divided into 2 groups; one group received a daily topical application of 50 microg/ml of latanoprost for 5 months; a control group had a daily application of vehicle. For an additional 3 months, 2 monkeys from each group were given 500 microg/ml latanoprost, while the remaining monkeys continued with the previous treatment. Hair growth was evaluated by monthly photographs and phototricho-graphic analysis. Fifty microg/ml of latanoprost caused minimal hair growth. Latanoprost at 500 microg/ml induced moderate to marked hair regrowth with 5-10% conversion of vellus hairs to intermediary or terminal hairs. The vehicle group showed no effect. Further evaluation of latanoprost as an agent for treatment of human androgenetic alopecia is indicated.

PMID: 12013211 [PubMed - in process]


#3

This video is not that encouraging.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZaKRsPAPps
»
»
»
»
»
» Source: PubMed
»
»
» Acta Derm Venereol 2002;82(1):7-12
»
»
» Uno H, Zimbric ML, Albert DM, Stjernschantz J.
»
»
» Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Centre, School of Medicine, University
» of Wisconsin-Madison, USA. huno4@attbi.com
»
»
» Latanoprost, a selective FP prostanoid receptor agonist used in the
» treatment of glaucoma, has a hypertrichotic side effect. Using the macaque
» model of androgenetic alopecia, we examined the effect of latanoprost on
» hair growth. Eight monkeys were divided into 2 groups; one group received a
» daily topical application of 50 microg/ml of latanoprost for 5 months; a
» control group had a daily application of vehicle. For an additional 3
» months, 2 monkeys from each group were given 500 microg/ml latanoprost,
» while the remaining monkeys continued with the previous treatment. Hair
» growth was evaluated by monthly photographs and phototricho-graphic
» analysis. Fifty microg/ml of latanoprost caused minimal hair growth.
» Latanoprost at 500 microg/ml induced moderate to marked hair regrowth with
» 5-10% conversion of vellus hairs to intermediary or terminal hairs. The
» vehicle group showed no effect. Further evaluation of latanoprost as an
» agent for treatment of human androgenetic alopecia is indicated.
»
»
» PMID: 12013211 [PubMed - in process]


#4

I wouldn’t put much stock in Bauman’s work. He’s proven himself quite dishonest in previous cases. For example, he quoted patients $20/graft using the NeoGraft transplantation device when the actual price is closer to $2.50/graft.

» This video is not that encouraging.
» http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZaKRsPAPps


#5

» This video is not that encouraging.
»
»
» http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZaKRsPAPps
» »
» »
» »
» »
» »
» » Source: PubMed
» »
» »
» » Acta Derm Venereol 2002;82(1):7-12
» »
» »
» » Uno H, Zimbric ML, Albert DM, Stjernschantz J.
» »
» »
» » Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Centre, School of Medicine,
» University
» » of Wisconsin-Madison, USA. huno4@attbi.com
» »
» »
» » Latanoprost, a selective FP prostanoid receptor agonist used in the
» » treatment of glaucoma, has a hypertrichotic side effect. Using the
» macaque
» » model of androgenetic alopecia, we examined the effect of latanoprost on
» » hair growth. Eight monkeys were divided into 2 groups; one group received
» a
» » daily topical application of 50 microg/ml of latanoprost for 5 months; a
» » control group had a daily application of vehicle. For an additional 3
» » months, 2 monkeys from each group were given 500 microg/ml latanoprost,
» » while the remaining monkeys continued with the previous treatment. Hair
» » growth was evaluated by monthly photographs and phototricho-graphic
» » analysis. Fifty microg/ml of latanoprost caused minimal hair growth.
» » Latanoprost at 500 microg/ml induced moderate to marked hair regrowth
» with
» » 5-10% conversion of vellus hairs to intermediary or terminal hairs. The
» » vehicle group showed no effect. Further evaluation of latanoprost as an
» » agent for treatment of human androgenetic alopecia is indicated.
» »
» »
» » PMID: 12013211 [PubMed - in process]

I haven’t seen the video, and I can’t open your video link, but I do know there is a video going around about some guy using latisse to grow hair. The problem is that latisse does not have a high enough dose of the active ingredient, bimatoprost. It has been well publicized that Allergan is experimenting with a higher dose of bimatoprost than you find in latisse, and practically everyone has figured out that it will take a stronger dose to grow scalp hair. So if your video link pertains to some guy being unable to grow much hair with latisse that comes as no surprise, the video doesn’t matter, and it does nothing to dissapoing those people who are hoping that latisse will grow significant amounts of hair on their heads.

I have said perhaps 25 times that latisse is not strong enough. Everyone knows this. We need a stronger version of latisse. I have said this at least 25 times. So if you have posted a video showing that latisse did not grow hair then all I can say is you really don’t get it.


#6

» I wouldn’t put much stock in Bauman’s work. He’s proven himself quite
» dishonest in previous cases. For example, he quoted patients $20/graft
» using the NeoGraft transplantation device when the actual price is closer
» to $2.50/graft.
»
»
» » This video is not that encouraging.
» » http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZaKRsPAPps

Yea, but I also think that the video link likely involves a patient who used latisse. I have said repeatedly that latisse is not strong enough - it does not contain enough of the active ingredient. Allergan is experimenting with higher doses of the active ingredient and practically everyone who has talked about latisse realizes that it will take a stronger dose then you find in latisse to grow scalp hair.

Don’t worry about what the previous poster said if he is talking about latisse specifically, because latisse is not strong enough. I have said this dozens of times but I guess he does not get it.


#7

I’m really excited to see what this product can do in higher concentrations.

This video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhBvdfOvXHw) mentions a woman who accidentally grew hair on her cheek after leaving some of the product on her face. Another Glaucoma patient tried a couple drops on her scalp (daily I guess), and she noticed some hair growth. They also mentioned that this drug is not systemic.

» Yea, but I also think that the video link likely involves a patient who
» used latisse. I have said repeatedly that latisse is not strong enough -
» it does not contain enough of the active ingredient. Allergan is
» experimenting with higher doses of the active ingredient and practically
» everyone who has talked about latisse realizes that it will take a stronger
» dose then you find in latisse to grow scalp hair.
»
» Don’t worry about what the previous poster said if he is talking about
» latisse specifically, because latisse is not strong enough. I have said
» this dozens of times but I guess he does not get it.


#8

» I’m really excited to see what this product can do in higher
» concentrations.
»
» This video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhBvdfOvXHw) mentions a woman
» who accidentally grew hair on her cheek after leaving some of the product
» on her face. Another Glaucoma patient tried a couple drops on her scalp
» (daily I guess), and she noticed some hair growth. They also mentioned that
» this drug is not systemic.
»
»
» » Yea, but I also think that the video link likely involves a patient who
» » used latisse. I have said repeatedly that latisse is not strong enough
» -
» » it does not contain enough of the active ingredient. Allergan is
» » experimenting with higher doses of the active ingredient and practically
» » everyone who has talked about latisse realizes that it will take a
» stronger
» » dose then you find in latisse to grow scalp hair.
» »
» » Don’t worry about what the previous poster said if he is talking about
» » latisse specifically, because latisse is not strong enough. I have said
» » this dozens of times but I guess he does not get it.

I wouldnt be surprised if some people arent already trying it at a higher concentration. The chemical composition is known and has a CAS No. meaning that it can be synthesised by any willing chemical company in a powder form.
The unknowns are what concentration to use, how much to apply to the scalp, how often and what would be the appropriate vehicle. Not sure what the solvent in Lattise is. Perhaps some of the testing information will be available in February after the trial.