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Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Treatments in Phoenix, Arizona?


#1

Before we assume this stuff is completely illegal in the US, we should investigate a number of clinics around the country that appear to be already offering Adipose-Derived Stem Cell treatments. For instance…

This clinic appears to be injecting the cells themselves, not the AAPE extract.

However, I would think if it’s lawful for them to inject the cells, it would be also lawful to inject fluid containing AAPE. That would just be common sense to me.

This whole question of what exactly is currently lawful and what isn’t, as far as clinical use of adult somatic (non-embryonic) stem cells, is in rapid flux in the US. The FDA has its eyes on the whole field, and it and has released a complicated mess of jumbled and confusing regulations, with respect to use of non-cultured and cultured autologous cells in clinical procedures.

Apparently, the key is if, how and for how long the cells are cultured. If the adipose-derived stem cells are simply removed from the body and NOT cultured, then I believe that is legal for doctors to do and minimally regulated (kind of like Platelet Rich Plasma). If they are cultured or induced to multiply, or biochemically manipulated, then that may not be legal according to the latest amended FDA regulations which were passed recently. Here’s a very interesting presentation about FDA regulations and guidelines on autologous cell therapies (which would include stem cell therapies)…

As far as I know, to get the AAPE extract, the cells probably have to be cultured for a while, though I’m not certain of this.

However the other thing that currently kicks ADSC’s into a higher FDA “regulatory bracket” is that they’re mainly for non-homologous use. That is, fat cells are removed from the abdomen (or some other fatty area of the body), adipose derived stem cells are removed, and those stem cells are injected – not back into the abdomen (which would be a homologous use), but somewhere else. In our case, that would be the scalp. This makes the FDA want to regulate the practice more, and in fact, that is what it does.

For non-homologous uses, a specific (and expensive, and time-consuming) application has to be made to get approval.

Anyway, this whole thing requires a lot more investigation.


#2

It could be worth trying. Like I’ve said before, the cells may be too big and shaped in a way that makes it difficult, or even impossible, for them to get into key areas that we may need them to go, but I don’t know that for sure. For all I know injecting these cells would be just as effective as injecting the AAPE. Maybe you would just have to inject more of the cells than the AAPE.

This is very interesting Roger. Let me know everything you find out in connection with these cells. For all we know injecting the cells would work.


#3

Roger and jarjar
How is this different than regular stem cells? N how confident are you guys that this works? I somehow don’t get the entire serum part. I’m sorry if it sounds dumb


#4

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by mm12[/postedby]
Roger and jarjar
How is this different than regular stem cells? N how confident are you guys that this works? I somehow don’t get the entire serum part. I’m sorry if it sounds dumb[/quote]

  1. There are different types of stem cells in the body. I don’t know biology well enough to know the exact difference between what each different type of stem cell produces but I know that different stem cells produce different “things.” By things I mean “proteins” and and other things…things that help the body grow…and maintain the body…and fight disease, and other body activities and functions.

  2. Adipose derived stem cells are the exact stem cells which produce AAPE in a sufficient amount in the human body. These are the exact cells that produce the growth factors that are inside of Histogen’s treatment.

  3. Some other fat cells produce a little of these growth factors but (at least in mice) adipose derived STEM cells produce 100 times as much of these growth factors than other fat cells.

  4. I’m not 100% sure about this, but according to some sources human adipose derived stem cells correspond to the cells that Yale isolated in mice that prompt hair to grow, which are called precursor adipose cells. Other then some things I’ve read on the internet stating that human adipose derived stem cells = mouse precursor cell, another thing that makes me think that these 2 cells correspond to each other is that AAPE comes from human adipose derived stem cells and AAPE grows hair in humans…just like precursor adipose cells grow hair in mice :wink: .

  5. Yale determined that the growth factors inside of these cells were sufficient to promote hair growth all by themselves. Here is a quote from a news article on the matter:

"Researchers found that a type of stem cell involved in creation of new fat cells — adipose precursor cells — was required for hair regeneration in mice."

#5

Is there anymore information about the adipose derived stem cells Roger? I’m considering giving it a try just to see what happens. But I live in Northern Washington state and would rather not go to Phoenix, Arizona if I don’t have to. I would rather do it close by so that I don’t have to miss a lot of work.

There is news about the Linder hair follicle bio-reactor project. They appear to be getting ready to start human trials. I’m hopeful and pessimistic both. I’m hopeful because it might work but pessimistic because it looks like scientists are still trying to resolve key hurdles in order to make this type of treatment work so human trials may be premature.

Let’s say they have created perfect follicles. That would be great. But there is still the issue that the scalp may need to be prepped for these types of lab-grown implants to work. Dr. Gardner (Team Jahoda) posted that the scalp may need to be prepared before implantation of lab-grown cellular treatments. He specifically said that something may have to be done to the scalp to ameliorate the reduction of these fat cells due to aga.

I think that the German team’s upcoming human trials is kind of a try-it-and see-what-happens effort and the team has only limited confidence that it will work.

Even if it works it will probably be very expensive. Basically, it’s a hair transplant utilizing lab-grown follicles instead the follicles from the back of your head. It’s a space-age hair transplant and could cost more than a regular hair transplant, which are already a little pricey.


#6

Here’s one in California:

http://www.fiercebiotech.com/press-releases/international-stem-cell-institute-launches-major-adipose-adult-stem-cell-therapy-prog

And the same clinic offering treatments in Phoenix, Arizona appears to have “associates” throughout the country. Although I’m not sure they all work specifically with adiposed derived stem cells. Check this out:

http://www.phoenixstemcelltreatmentcenter.com/about-us/our-affiliate-network

And here are two links about another clinic and they appear to work with ADSCs:

http://stemgenex.com/

I thought you might find the below article interesting as well. It’s a veterinarian talking about how she’s using ADSCs to treat animals. I know it doesn’t apply to human hair loss but it does show how ADSC therapy is becoming more and more accepted:


#7

Turns out, from my research, ADSC clinics in the US will treat practically every illness and disorder imaginable, including generalized “aging”, but specifically will not treat hair loss.

This should surprise and alarm everyone here. I am trying to determine why they will not treat hair loss, and I’m sure the reason will be very interesting.


#8

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
Turns out, from my research, ADSC clinics in the US will treat practically every illness and disorder imaginable, including generalized “aging”, but specifically will not treat hair loss.

This should surprise and alarm everyone here. I am trying to determine why they will not treat hair loss, and I’m sure the reason will be very interesting.[/quote]

Maybe we should try to talk some of them into using ADSCs to treat hair loss. Perhaps sufficient demand has not been put to them. Perhaps they could be talked into trying it if we pressed the issue with them.


#9

Roger this idea I have that injecting the adipose derived stem cells might not be as effective as injecting the cells is speculation on my part.

My concern is that the cells are bigger so they might not be able to get into key (tight) places that they would need to reach in order to prompt hair growth.

AAPE is a powder turned into a liquid, and I believe that the particles in AAPE are extremely tiny because they are tiny enough that they come from inside of the cells. Injected into the skin I think they travel all throughout the follicles.

The cells are larger and because of their larger size, shape, and greater rigidity they might not be able to squeeze into tight areas that they would have to reach in order to activate follicles to grow hair again. But I don’t know that any of this is true. I’m just saying that this is possibility could lead to the cells being ineffective even though the cell extract (AAPE) works.

For all I know if we get these cells injected they will produce and excrete these same AAPE proteins and growth factors and those excretions will go all throughout the follicles just like injected AAPE does. If that is the case then injecting these ADSCs might work just as well, or even better, than AAPE.