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270 CIT grafts restore crown on Class 3V - 1 yr. post-op (case B)


#1

This patient had a Norwood Class 3 Vertex balding pattern and medium caliber, brown hair with slightly above average donor density. The goal of this patient was to avoid shockloss and restore the natural density in the vertex that once existed. At the young age of 20 years old, this patient began noticing hair loss in the vertex and became self–conscious. Dr. Cole’s treatment plan for this patient was to maximize medical therapy then transplant approximately 270 CIT grafts into the vertex at the time this patient was 30+ years of age.

Hair loss in a typical thinning crown (vertex) of the scalp normally gradually enlarges until the entire crown becomes bald. The most difficult aspect of restoring density in the crown is the task of mimicking it’s natural orientation. The hair’s growth pattern in the crown/vertex is helical and is commonly seen as a clockwise whorl. In normal circumstances, this region of the scalp requires more transplanted follicles than any other area due to the fact that it has no consistent grain.

The ability to transplant such an area as the crown is a true form of artistry. Follicles found in the crown can naturally be single-hair follicular units or multi-hair follicular units. Patients seeking hair transplant surgery to restore the crown should do so after understanding that hair loss is progressive and that no hair transplant procedure can increase the overall volume of hair. Medical therapy can be advantageous after a patient understands all of the pros, cons, and possible side-effects.

At 12 months post-op, the results of this case have progressed in an upward direction. Yet another satisfied patient who can enjoy a more youthful appearance with hair and wear it short! :ok:

My advice is not medical advice


#2

» This patient had a Norwood Class 3 Vertex balding pattern and medium
» caliber, brown hair with slightly above average donor density. The goal of
» this patient was to avoid shockloss and restore the natural density in the
» vertex that once existed. At the young age of 20 years old, this patient
» began noticing hair loss in the vertex and became self–conscious. Dr.
» Cole’s treatment plan for this patient was to maximize medical therapy then
» transplant approximately 270 CIT grafts into the vertex at the time this
» patient was 30+ years of age.
»
» Hair loss in a typical thinning crown (vertex) of the scalp normally
» gradually enlarges until the entire crown becomes bald. The most difficult
» aspect of restoring density in the crown is the task of mimicking it’s
» natural orientation. The hair’s growth pattern in the crown/vertex is
» helical and is commonly seen as a clockwise whorl. In normal
» circumstances, this region of the scalp requires more transplanted
» follicles than any other area due to the fact that it has no consistent
» grain.
»
»
» The ability to transplant such an area as the crown is a true form of
» artistry. Follicles found in the crown can naturally be single-hair
» follicular units or multi-hair follicular units. Patients seeking hair
» transplant surgery to restore the crown should do so after understanding
» that hair loss is progressive and that no hair transplant procedure can
» increase the overall volume of hair. Medical therapy can be advantageous
» after a patient understands all of the pros, cons, and possible
» side-effects.
»
» At 12 months post-op, the results of this case have progressed in an
» upward direction. Yet another satisfied patient who can enjoy a more
» youthful appearance with hair and wear it short! :ok:
»
»


»
»
»
»
»
»
»
» My advice is not medical advice

Results without the strip scar. Looks good.


#3

»
» Results without the strip scar. Looks good.

Hi,

That is my sentiment exactly. So few grafts for a very good result in the crown! The density is just right in case the loss in the crown expands at a later date. The best part is that this procedure allows the patient to wear a short hairstyle in the front of the scalp and in the rear (donor area).